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U.S. sues D-Link, alleges lax security in routers, cameras
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Roy
2017-01-06 14:33:23 UTC
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The U.S. Federal Trade Commission filed a lawsuit against D-Link Corp on
Thursday, accusing the Taiwan-based manufacturer of failing to take
reasonable steps to protect its routers and internet-linked security
cameras from hackers.

http://www.reuters.com/article/uk-d-link-ftc-idUSKBN14P2ME
n***@sbcglobal.net
2017-01-06 18:41:02 UTC
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Post by Roy
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission filed a lawsuit against D-Link Corp on
Thursday, accusing the Taiwan-based manufacturer of failing to take
reasonable steps to protect its routers and internet-linked security
cameras from hackers.
http://www.reuters.com/article/uk-d-link-ftc-idUSKBN14P2ME
I have some Trendnet cameras and they got in trouble a couple years back for lax security. This is a strange area of tech because tech savvy people might like to have access to their cameras and use them in the way they see fit. I actually don't have any cameras that keep watch inside (where the real problem with lax security is). I have 5 watching outdoors of which 3 are on one system and 2 are independent with their own storage onboard (no hub needed). There's nothing on those cameras that would interest hackers and the worse case scenario would be increased bandwidth if they could access them.

The best thing about security cameras is that they deter thieves that is if they are obvious (mine are). By the time they could do anything to shut them down it would be too late so they move on.
David Kaye
2017-01-07 07:15:44 UTC
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Post by n***@sbcglobal.net
The best thing about security cameras is that they deter thieves that is
if they are obvious (mine are).
By the time they could do anything to shut them down it would be too late
so they move on.
I tell my security camera clients that cameras are useful for employee theft
and misconduct, but not all that useful for burglary or even robbery unless
they know the culprits. One of the restaurants I deal with is interesting
because I saw the manager snorting coke in a storeroom. He does his job and
I'm not about to rat on him. But the brazen attitude that he had of doing
it right under a security camera made me laugh. Was it disdain for the
owner? Probably not. It was more likely that he felt that the owner would
be cool with it, so he wasn't too worried about snorting on-camera. The
owner does look in on the cameras from time to time, usually when there is
an irregularity in income for a particular shift, so he goes back to look at
how that shift is handling customers.
poldy
2017-01-07 19:46:42 UTC
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Post by David Kaye
Post by n***@sbcglobal.net
The best thing about security cameras is that they deter thieves that is
if they are obvious (mine are).
By the time they could do anything to shut them down it would be too late
so they move on.
I tell my security camera clients that cameras are useful for employee theft
and misconduct, but not all that useful for burglary or even robbery unless
they know the culprits. One of the restaurants I deal with is interesting
because I saw the manager snorting coke in a storeroom. He does his job and
I'm not about to rat on him. But the brazen attitude that he had of doing
it right under a security camera made me laugh. Was it disdain for the
owner? Probably not. It was more likely that he felt that the owner would
be cool with it, so he wasn't too worried about snorting on-camera. The
owner does look in on the cameras from time to time, usually when there is
an irregularity in income for a particular shift, so he goes back to look at
how that shift is handling customers.
Coke can be an expensive habit.

Maybe that could cause income irregularity?
David Kaye
2017-01-08 02:00:07 UTC
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Post by poldy
Coke can be an expensive habit.
Maybe that could cause income irregularity?
Well, the owner keeps close tabs on the operation and the guy has been
manager for a number of years. Some people have addictive personalities,
but most do not. And interesting study last year showed that people who
become addicts in war zones stop using drugs when they get back. So, some
drugs are really stress relievers.
David Kaye
2017-01-07 07:18:54 UTC
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Post by Roy
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission filed a lawsuit against D-Link Corp on
Thursday, accusing the Taiwan-based manufacturer of failing to take
reasonable steps to protect its routers and internet-linked security
cameras from hackers.
It would be nice to know how the routers are being compromised, whether
there is some kind of back door or broken encryption or whatever. I don't
like D-Link because they seem poorly made and tended to overheat where I've
used them.

I'm still a TP Link fan. I hope that their stuff is okay.
Jeff Liebermann
2017-01-08 02:23:12 UTC
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On Fri, 6 Jan 2017 23:18:54 -0800, "David Kaye"
Post by David Kaye
It would be nice to know how the routers are being compromised, whether
there is some kind of back door or broken encryption or whatever.
Some more detail from the FTC web pile:
<https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2017/01/ftc-charges-d-link-put-consumers-privacy-risk-due-inadequate>
The actual complaint:
<https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/cases/170105_d-link_complaint_and_exhibits.pdf>
See Section 15 for what is bothering the FTC.
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Jeff Liebermann ***@cruzio.com
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Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
b***@MIX.COM
2017-02-08 20:10:46 UTC
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Post by Jeff Liebermann
Post by David Kaye
It would be nice to know how the routers are being compromised, whether
there is some kind of back door or broken encryption or whatever.
<https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2017/01/ftc-charges-d-link-put-consumers-privacy-risk-due-inadequate>
<https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/cases/170105_d-link_complaint_and_exhibits.pdf>
See Section 15 for what is bothering the FTC.
Heh...

| Reverse Engineering a D-Link Backdoor
| By Craig | October 12, 2013 | Embedded Systems, Security

http://www.devttys0.com/2013/10/reverse-engineering-a-d-link-backdoor/

Billy Y..
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