Discussion:
Does PacBell block OpenVPN?
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David Arnstein
2015-11-02 01:30:58 UTC
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I am in a hotel in Carmel today and that hotel provides internet
service via Pacific Bell DSL. OpenVPN does not work on its usual port
udp 1194. But I got it to work (slowly) on a tcp port.

I am not confident about my observations because everything seems slow
and balky. Does Pacific Bell block a lot of ports? I know about port
tcp 25 (email) but what about others? I am googling this question now
but it doesn't work!
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David Arnstein (00)
arnstein+***@pobox.com {{ }}
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Julian Macassey
2015-11-02 01:40:05 UTC
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On Mon, 2 Nov 2015 01:30:58 +0000 (UTC), David Arnstein
Post by David Arnstein
I am in a hotel in Carmel today and that hotel provides internet
service via Pacific Bell DSL. OpenVPN does not work on its usual port
udp 1194. But I got it to work (slowly) on a tcp port.
I am not confident about my observations because everything seems slow
and balky. Does Pacific Bell block a lot of ports? I know about port
tcp 25 (email) but what about others? I am googling this question now
but it doesn't work!
Many hotel net services block all sorts of ports, and are
often slow and flakey. This is expecially bad at hotels that
charge for net access.
--
"I am glad to see that a system of labor prevails under which laborers
can strike when they want to." - Abraham Lincoln
Roy
2015-11-02 05:11:06 UTC
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Post by Julian Macassey
On Mon, 2 Nov 2015 01:30:58 +0000 (UTC), David Arnstein
Post by David Arnstein
I am in a hotel in Carmel today and that hotel provides internet
service via Pacific Bell DSL. OpenVPN does not work on its usual port
udp 1194. But I got it to work (slowly) on a tcp port.
I am not confident about my observations because everything seems slow
and balky. Does Pacific Bell block a lot of ports? I know about port
tcp 25 (email) but what about others? I am googling this question now
but it doesn't work!
Many hotel net services block all sorts of ports, and are
often slow and flakey. This is expecially bad at hotels that
charge for net access.
Some places block UDP.

I put my OpenVPN on TCP port 443. Haven't had a problem :-)
d***@53.usenet.us.com
2015-11-02 23:47:51 UTC
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Post by David Arnstein
I am not confident about my observations because everything seems slow
and balky.
I have found so many hotel/coffeeshops, Especially the "free" ones, to be
so slow that I gave up, and generally use cellular data instead.

Even if you go over your data plan for the month, the incremental cost
might be less than the hotel charge.
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
sms
2015-11-03 14:09:49 UTC
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Post by d***@53.usenet.us.com
Post by David Arnstein
I am not confident about my observations because everything seems slow
and balky.
I have found so many hotel/coffeeshops, Especially the "free" ones, to be
so slow that I gave up, and generally use cellular data instead.
Even if you go over your data plan for the month, the incremental cost
might be less than the hotel charge.
Very few hotels still charge for Wi-Fi. The last holdout seemed to be
Embassy Suites and they relented finally, as long as you reserve
directly through Hilton and not through a third party (and reserving
directly is almost always much cheaper anyway).

One thing I've seen recently is free Wi-Fi that looks at your MAC
address and kicks you off after a certain amount of time. A MAC address
spoofer takes care of that problem.
poldy
2015-11-03 20:33:02 UTC
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Post by sms
Post by d***@53.usenet.us.com
Post by David Arnstein
I am not confident about my observations because everything seems slow
and balky.
I have found so many hotel/coffeeshops, Especially the "free" ones, to be
so slow that I gave up, and generally use cellular data instead.
Even if you go over your data plan for the month, the incremental cost
might be less than the hotel charge.
Very few hotels still charge for Wi-Fi. The last holdout seemed to be
Embassy Suites and they relented finally, as long as you reserve
directly through Hilton and not through a third party (and reserving
directly is almost always much cheaper anyway).
One thing I've seen recently is free Wi-Fi that looks at your MAC
address and kicks you off after a certain amount of time. A MAC address
spoofer takes care of that problem.
No at the last NYC hotel I went to, they offered free Wifi which was
under 2 Mbps.

They offered "business class" wifi for an additional fee.

Just put my iPhone against the window sill and used it to tether my
laptop and other devices.
d***@53.usenet.us.com
2015-11-04 01:00:57 UTC
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No at the last NYC hotel I went to, they offered free Wifi which was under 2 Mbps.
Way under, and really crappy coverage. Works by the TV, not by the bed.
They offered "business class" wifi for an additional fee.
Back to business as usual.

In June 2015, the Hyatt Regency in San Diego, which charges enough that
they ought to be abkle to toss a couple of freebies, had the useless free
WiFi, and charged for a wired connection.
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
d***@53.usenet.us.com
2015-11-04 01:05:35 UTC
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Post by sms
One thing I've seen recently is free Wi-Fi that looks at your MAC
address and kicks you off after a certain amount of time. A MAC address
spoofer takes care of that problem.
First connected were the only ones that worked for me, last year.

I was in a hotel for a soccer tournament. First 250 devices to connect to
the Free WiFi is all that worked. They had multiple subnets, and it looked
like they all connected, but in fact, only 250 actually worked to the
internet.

Scanning the network was almost a market survey. "Everybody" had a phone
connected.

They were so overloaded that the menus on little stands outside the
restaurants, which seemed to be be iPad Minis in cases, showed a pretty
blank page with no text, or the same error message that I had on my tablet,
which I didn't connect on day one. The phone that I connected on day one
worked.
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
David Kaye
2015-11-08 06:51:40 UTC
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Post by d***@53.usenet.us.com
I was in a hotel for a soccer tournament. First 250 devices to connect to
the Free WiFi is all that worked. They had multiple subnets, and it looked
like they all connected, but in fact, only 250 actually worked to the
internet.
Yeah, many routers have limits of 250. My supplier has routers in different
classes; one can allegedly handle 5,000 concurrent users and has provisions
for 3 connections to the ISP. It also costs an arm and a leg, but there you
go...




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David Kaye
2015-11-08 06:47:51 UTC
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One thing I've seen recently is free Wi-Fi that looks at your MAC address
and kicks you off after a certain amount of time. A MAC address spoofer
takes care of that problem.
The systems I install track MAC addresses, but a simple look at the use logs
can spot them easily.



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Julian Macassey
2015-11-10 04:29:15 UTC
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Post by David Kaye
One thing I've seen recently is free Wi-Fi that looks at your MAC address
and kicks you off after a certain amount of time. A MAC address spoofer
takes care of that problem.
The systems I install track MAC addresses, but a simple look at the use logs
can spot them easily.
You can spot a user who sets his own MAC address?

How do you do that?
--
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
- George Orwell
David Kaye
2015-11-08 06:45:37 UTC
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Post by d***@53.usenet.us.com
I have found so many hotel/coffeeshops, Especially the "free" ones, to be
so slow that I gave up, and generally use cellular data instead.
Depends on the free wi-fi. I manage wi-fi at a couple cafes and I set
throughput at at least 20 Mbps, and stop down uploads to about 0.5 Mbps so
as to discourage torrents. However, many such wi-fi systems are managed by
vendors using Meraki equipment, which usually is set to slow down downloads
if there is any indication of illegal or illicit use, DoS attacks, etc.

It's interesting; one cafe typically had about 40 users over 24 hours and
they were staying on for hours at a time. After I came on the scene and
locked down use to 2 hours and slowed down the uploads, the service turned
over so much that the same system now manages about 240 users per 24 hours,
and everybody is happy, except the torrent users, of course.




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