Discussion:
Cable modem errors and 600 MHz
(too old to reply)
David Arnstein
2016-02-12 06:33:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
My cable modem is working with 20 downstream channels. I see that there
is a sharply higher number of errors on a single band that is at 603.00
MHz.

This article from 2014:
http://www.nist.gov/ctl/rf-technology/rf_fields/cell_phone_cable.cfm

indicates that cell phone LTE comms might be at fault. In my household,
we have Verizon and Cricket (AT&T) smart phones. Do these networks use
600 MHz heavily?

The above article suggests that CATV cables are more often at fault than
cable modems. Maybe I should do some replacing? I am not willing or able
to tear up my walls so I don't know how much this would help. Any
suggestons?
--
David Arnstein (00)
arnstein+***@pobox.com {{ }}
^^
David Kaye
2016-02-12 10:50:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Arnstein
The above article suggests that CATV cables are more often at fault than
cable modems. Maybe I should do some replacing? I am not willing or able
to tear up my walls so I don't know how much this would help. Any
suggestons?
Cables don't fail, but their connectors can, especially when dissimilar
metals of the connectors and the cable are joined. And given how much of
this stuff is aluminum these days and its tendency to corrode easily, I'd
say that if you're wondering about the cable, remove the connectors and any
cable splices and redo them with fresh new ones. If you have a soldering
iron and some rosin core solder around you might want to actually solder
part of the shield to the outer conductor of the connector just to make sure
that you have a solid connection.
Steve Pope
2016-02-12 12:33:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Arnstein
My cable modem is working with 20 downstream channels. I see that there
is a sharply higher number of errors on a single band that is at 603.00
MHz.
http://www.nist.gov/ctl/rf-technology/rf_fields/cell_phone_cable.cfm
indicates that cell phone LTE comms might be at fault. In my household,
we have Verizon and Cricket (AT&T) smart phones. Do these networks use
600 MHz heavily?
Not yet, nobody is using the 600 band as of yet.

Steve
Jeff Liebermann
2016-02-12 18:49:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 12 Feb 2016 06:33:58 +0000 (UTC), David Arnstein
Post by David Arnstein
My cable modem is working with 20 downstream channels. I see that there
is a sharply higher number of errors on a single band that is at 603.00
MHz.
http://www.nist.gov/ctl/rf-technology/rf_fields/cell_phone_cable.cfm
indicates that cell phone LTE comms might be at fault. In my household,
we have Verizon and Cricket (AT&T) smart phones. Do these networks use
600 MHz heavily?
No. LTE starts roughly in the 700 MHz region. Also, I doubt that
your cell phone would produce enough of a signal to cause much
interference.

603.25 MHz is the video carrier frequency of OTA (over the air) TV
Channel 36, which goes from 602 to 608 MHz. KICU is in San Jose, and
might be the culprit:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KICU-TV>
Post by David Arnstein
The above article suggests that CATV cables are more often at fault than
cable modems. Maybe I should do some replacing? I am not willing or able
to tear up my walls so I don't know how much this would help. Any
suggestons?
If you have Radio Shack RG-59/u coax cable in the walls, and ring
crimp type F connectors, I would rip it out and recycle the copper.
It's junk. However, it's its good quality RG-6/u double shielded
cable, with push-on type F connectors, you're probably ok. For
testing connectors, just pull on the connection. If the connector
falls apart in your hand, or feels loose, there's your ingress
problem.
--
Jeff Liebermann ***@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
Loading...