Discussion:
Verizon, iPad question
(too old to reply)
Steve Pope
2015-06-06 18:13:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I am neither familiar with Verizon nor iPad's (or any Apple product).

An aquaintance in Texas has an iPad with 10 G/month of data from
Verizon. She is paying $90/month and would like the turn the iPad
into a hotspot (she has no other home internet access presently, and
getting DSL or cable is difficult for her.

Seems reasonable... is it? Can it be done on Verizon?

A co-aquaintance is this weekend in Texas attempting to get this going
for her. One observation is there are both ATT and T-Mobile signals
at the location, as well as Verizon.

(I'm trying to find out which iPad model.)

I recall hearing somewhere that devices with more than a 6.5" screen
will often not become hotspots no matter how much you torque them.

Thanks

Steve
Peter Lawrence
2015-06-06 23:27:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Steve Pope
I am neither familiar with Verizon nor iPad's (or any Apple product).
An aquaintance in Texas has an iPad with 10 G/month of data from
Verizon. She is paying $90/month and would like the turn the iPad
into a hotspot (she has no other home internet access presently, and
getting DSL or cable is difficult for her.
Seems reasonable... is it? Can it be done on Verizon?
A co-aquaintance is this weekend in Texas attempting to get this going
for her. One observation is there are both ATT and T-Mobile signals
at the location, as well as Verizon.
(I'm trying to find out which iPad model.)
I recall hearing somewhere that devices with more than a 6.5" screen
will often not become hotspots no matter how much you torque them.
Thanks
Steve
A five-second Google search would have led you to your answer. Here's the
process:

http://www.verizonwireless.com/support/knowledge-base-41004/


- Peter
Steve Pope
2015-06-07 00:04:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Lawrence
A five-second Google search would have led you to your answer. Here's the
http://www.verizonwireless.com/support/knowledge-base-41004/
Thanks Peter

Steve
Steve Pope
2015-06-08 04:48:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Steve Pope
Post by Peter Lawrence
A five-second Google search would have led you to your answer.
http://www.verizonwireless.com/support/knowledge-base-41004/
Thanks Peter
Turns out there are some nuances, or at least one.

The user's laptop will not connect to the iPad hotspot,
although other devices will. Conversely, the laptop did
associate with a neighbor's wifi and some data transfered
for a short while.

My accomplice then called Apple, and was informed a device must
be 11n or better to connect to the iPad configured as a hotspot.
The user's laptop, which was new in 2009, is stated to be
"11g / draft n".

My accomplice then decided the best immediate plan was
to get a bluetooth keyboard for the iPad so that it could
be used more conveniently, and now the user has processed some
email, etc. by this method, and is a happier camper.

Since the user ultimately wants both the laptop and a
desktop to be on-line, it seems they ultimately need
a wireless router that can have the iPad on its WAN
side. (A wireless bridge?) This upgrade will await the next
visit to Texas, whenever that is.

Steve
Roy
2015-06-08 04:59:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Add a USB Wifi dongle.

I use an Edimax one on a laptop from 2005

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=1143227&gclid=CMHSmu6m_8UCFQ6VvQodwIcANg&Q=&is=REG&A=details

If you need it with standalone, you will basically need two routers
connected via ethernet. One connects to the Ipad and the other acts a
Wifi hotspot. I suggest a Mikrotik for the one connected to the Ipad.
I know it can do that. There is a now low end Mikrotik called the hAP
lite. Runs about $22.

http://www.streakwave.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=RB941-2nD
Post by Steve Pope
Post by Steve Pope
Post by Peter Lawrence
A five-second Google search would have led you to your answer.
http://www.verizonwireless.com/support/knowledge-base-41004/
Thanks Peter
Turns out there are some nuances, or at least one.
The user's laptop will not connect to the iPad hotspot,
although other devices will. Conversely, the laptop did
associate with a neighbor's wifi and some data transfered
for a short while.
My accomplice then called Apple, and was informed a device must
be 11n or better to connect to the iPad configured as a hotspot.
The user's laptop, which was new in 2009, is stated to be
"11g / draft n".
My accomplice then decided the best immediate plan was
to get a bluetooth keyboard for the iPad so that it could
be used more conveniently, and now the user has processed some
email, etc. by this method, and is a happier camper.
Since the user ultimately wants both the laptop and a
desktop to be on-line, it seems they ultimately need
a wireless router that can have the iPad on its WAN
side. (A wireless bridge?) This upgrade will await the next
visit to Texas, whenever that is.
Steve
Steve Pope
2015-06-08 05:15:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Roy
Add a USB Wifi dongle.
Yep.
Post by Roy
I use an Edimax one on a laptop from 2005
Ironically, I had just a few months ago deemed useless and tossed
out an Lucent Orinoco WiFi card for laptops (the kind that has a sort
of edge-connecter about 1.5" across ... I totally forget what that
connector was called).

In any case, a new dongle is better.
Post by Roy
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=1143227&gclid=CMHSmu6m_8UCFQ6VvQodwIcANg&Q=&is=REG&A=details
If you need it with standalone, you will basically need two routers
connected via ethernet. One connects to the Ipad and the other acts a
Wifi hotspot. I suggest a Mikrotik for the one connected to the Ipad.
I know it can do that. There is a now low end Mikrotik called the hAP
lite. Runs about $22.
http://www.streakwave.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=RB941-2nD
Good ideas, thanks.

Steve
poldy
2015-06-23 16:35:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Steve Pope
Post by Peter Lawrence
A five-second Google search would have led you to your answer. Here's the
http://www.verizonwireless.com/support/knowledge-base-41004/
Thanks Peter
Steve
Actually, recent iPads with cellular radios are great tethering devices.

They're unlocked and have LTE band support for just about every region
and they have plenty of battery life.

I've just returned from 2 weeks in Italy. Paid 30 Euro for 10 GB of
data, which included a lot of "4G" data in some of the bigger towns. I
think the fastest speeds were about 30 Mbps up and down.

I conserved most of it until the last few days, when I downloaded some
TV shows from my Tivo to my iPad.

Rest of the time, I tethered my iPhones for GPS, surfing, etc.
sms
2015-06-25 21:31:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 6/23/2015 9:35 AM, poldy wrote:

<snip>
Post by poldy
Actually, recent iPads with cellular radios are great tethering devices.
They're unlocked and have LTE band support for just about every region
and they have plenty of battery life.
I've just returned from 2 weeks in Italy. Paid 30 Euro for 10 GB of
data, which included a lot of "4G" data in some of the bigger towns. I
think the fastest speeds were about 30 Mbps up and down.
I conserved most of it until the last few days, when I downloaded some
TV shows from my Tivo to my iPad.
Rest of the time, I tethered my iPhones for GPS, surfing, etc.
Tablets with a GPS chip make a good mapping GPS with stored off-line
maps. There are free apps and maps though the paid maps are better.

Apple forgot to put a GPS in the Wi-Fi only iPads so the mapping apps
won't work on those (unless you also get a Bluetooth GPS adapter), but
most Android Wi-Fi only tablets do have a GPS chip, and iPads with
cellular radios have the GPS chip. A 7" screen tablet is a lot easier to
look at maps on than a 4-5" phone screen.

You don't want to be using up massive amounts of data on Google Maps,
plus offline maps work even where there is no 3G or 4G data available.
poldy
2015-06-26 06:24:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by sms
<snip>
Post by poldy
Actually, recent iPads with cellular radios are great tethering devices.
They're unlocked and have LTE band support for just about every region
and they have plenty of battery life.
I've just returned from 2 weeks in Italy. Paid 30 Euro for 10 GB of
data, which included a lot of "4G" data in some of the bigger towns. I
think the fastest speeds were about 30 Mbps up and down.
I conserved most of it until the last few days, when I downloaded some
TV shows from my Tivo to my iPad.
Rest of the time, I tethered my iPhones for GPS, surfing, etc.
Tablets with a GPS chip make a good mapping GPS with stored off-line
maps. There are free apps and maps though the paid maps are better.
Apple forgot to put a GPS in the Wi-Fi only iPads so the mapping apps
won't work on those (unless you also get a Bluetooth GPS adapter), but
most Android Wi-Fi only tablets do have a GPS chip, and iPads with
cellular radios have the GPS chip. A 7" screen tablet is a lot easier to
look at maps on than a 4-5" phone screen.
You don't want to be using up massive amounts of data on Google Maps,
plus offline maps work even where there is no 3G or 4G data available.
Actually Google Maps doesn't use that much data. One time in Corsica, I
got directions for a long drive and it turned out well before I reached
my destination, I lost the signal so I was running off cached mapping data.

Reason I like Google Maps is that you can do a lot of planning with the
desktop version, saving POIs and directions into custom maps. Well it
used to be very useful before Google made changes to the mapping
engines. Still is but the user experience has declined.

In any event, I can save POIs that I plan to visit and then also do ad
hoc searches, such as looking for gas stations. You can't easily do
that with cached maps.
d***@53.usenet.us.com
2015-07-02 01:58:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by poldy
Post by sms
You don't want to be using up massive amounts of data on Google Maps,
plus offline maps work even where there is no 3G or 4G data available.
Actually Google Maps doesn't use that much data. One time in Corsica, I
got directions for a long drive and it turned out well before I reached
my destination, I lost the signal so I was running off cached mapping data.
As I recall, if you are in your hotel on WiFi, get a route, and sort of
zoom in and follow the route, Google Maps will cache it all, so you don't
fetch any while on the route.

There is specifically the ability to "Make Available Offline", but it
didn't seem that I needed that extra step.

Long ago, I didn't have any data cached, and when I lost signal, I was
following a blue line on a blank screen. Fortunately the turns were easy
enough to see.
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
David Kaye
2015-07-02 06:36:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by d***@53.usenet.us.com
Long ago, I didn't have any data cached, and when I lost signal, I was
following a blue line on a blank screen. Fortunately the turns were easy
enough to see.
I have a tablet and I have laptops. When driving I use paper maps. First,
maps don't suffer from the online cleverness of companies such as Google
always changing names and designations of things. I have no idea why the
Bay Bridge is called by the Eisenhower Highway and the Lincoln Highway. The
Eisenhower Highway was "officially" adopted but no state put up signs
designating it. And the Lincoln Highway ceased its existence when the U.S.
highway system began using numbers instead of names.

So, someone asking how to get back to the Eisenhower Highway or the Lincoln
Highway will have their query met with confused stares. Nobody uses either
of those names. (I happen to be a Lincoln Highway buff, but I never use the
term except when following the old roads on a lark.)

The other thing that's good about paper maps is they're easier to comprehend
given the larger format. It's much easier to imagine the distance between
SF and Chico when using a paper map than when using any of the mapping
software. Resize the map so that both locations fit and all the detail is
gone.




---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Julian Macassey
2015-07-02 15:19:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Kaye
Post by d***@53.usenet.us.com
enough to see.
I have a tablet and I have laptops. When driving I use paper maps. First,
maps don't suffer from the online cleverness of companies such as Google
always changing names and designations of things. I have no idea why the
Bay Bridge is called by the Eisenhower Highway and the Lincoln Highway. The
Eisenhower Highway was "officially" adopted but no state put up signs
designating it. And the Lincoln Highway ceased its existence when the U.S.
highway system began using numbers instead of names.
People talk about the Nimitz Freeway. What is it? The
only indication that you are on the mysterious Nimitz is when
traveling South and ypou see on the edge of the freeway the
Nimitz Motel.
Post by David Kaye
So, someone asking how to get back to the Eisenhower Highway or the Lincoln
Highway will have their query met with confused stares. Nobody uses either
of those names. (I happen to be a Lincoln Highway buff, but I never use the
term except when following the old roads on a lark.)
My favourite named and forgotten freeway is the "Richard
M. Nixon Freeway" It is the 90 freeway in Los Angeles. I used to
have a Thomas Bros map book with that designation.

In Chicago the radio traffic announcers talk about 'The
Kennedy" etc. But there are no freeway signs with those names.

In Los Angeles, there are two Freeways calling themselves
the "Hollywood Freeway", the 101 and the 170.
--
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
- George Orwell
Peter Lawrence
2015-07-02 15:49:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Kaye
Post by d***@53.usenet.us.com
Long ago, I didn't have any data cached, and when I lost signal, I was
following a blue line on a blank screen. Fortunately the turns were easy
enough to see.
I have a tablet and I have laptops. When driving I use paper maps.
The only "paper" maps useable while driving were the Thomas Bros. maps that
were bound-up in book form. The folding paper maps are very unwieldy while
on the road. That's why most who drove extensively for a living bought and
used the more expensive Thomas Bros. maps.

A smartphone properly mounted on the dash or windshield (in California that
would be on the driver-side corner of the dash or windshield) is much more
useful and safer way to navigate and find your way around town. Especially
since many smartphone map apps can be controlled by one's voice.

Folder paper maps are mainly useful outside of the car -- at home, in the
motel or in the office -- when planning a trip or just wanting to get a feel
of the geography involved.


- Peter

Loading...