Discussion:
Comcast/TWC merger
(too old to reply)
Roy
2014-02-13 22:42:31 UTC
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Check Out How Much Of The US Market Comcast Will Control After The Time
Warner Deal

More than AT&T and Verizon combined!

http://tinyurl.com/lllw3gq
poldy
2014-02-14 00:17:55 UTC
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In article
Post by Roy
Check Out How Much Of The US Market Comcast Will Control After The Time
Warner Deal
More than AT&T and Verizon combined!
http://tinyurl.com/lllw3gq
And it'll probably get approved by the administration.

Bye bye net neutrality.

Bye cord-cutters.
Bhairitu
2014-02-14 20:01:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by poldy
In article
Post by Roy
Check Out How Much Of The US Market Comcast Will Control After The Time
Warner Deal
More than AT&T and Verizon combined!
http://tinyurl.com/lllw3gq
And it'll probably get approved by the administration.
Bye bye net neutrality.
Bye cord-cutters.
Nuke Comcast! The fascist pig Roberts family deserve to roast in hell or
at least arrested by DHS because they are indeed a threat to national
security. So sad what the 21st century is becoming.
Eric Weaver
2014-02-14 21:11:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bhairitu
Post by poldy
In article
Post by Roy
Check Out How Much Of The US Market Comcast Will Control After The Time
Warner Deal
More than AT&T and Verizon combined!
http://tinyurl.com/lllw3gq
And it'll probably get approved by the administration.
Bye bye net neutrality.
Bye cord-cutters.
Nuke Comcast! The fascist pig Roberts family deserve to roast in hell or
at least arrested by DHS because they are indeed a threat to national
security. So sad what the 21st century is becoming.
My suggestion: Read books. Most folks have libraries nearby, full of
the darn things. Many of them have mobile apps (such as the ones made
by my employer) that let you download certain of the material onto your
phone/tablet/fridge.

The way to win the Cable game is Not To Play.
David Kaye
2014-02-15 00:59:51 UTC
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Post by Eric Weaver
My suggestion: Read books. Most folks have libraries nearby, full of
the darn things. Many of them have mobile apps (such as the ones made by
my employer) that let you download certain of the material onto your
phone/tablet/fridge.
I saw a book just the other day. My friend Paul was reading it. The beauty
of books is that you don't have to recharge any batteries, it's easy to
bookmark pages you want to go back to, you don't have to worry about them
disappearing due to copyright disputes (as with, say, Kindle), and they
don't break if you drop them. The only downside is that backups are a bitch
to do.
poldy
2014-02-16 01:07:02 UTC
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Post by David Kaye
Post by Eric Weaver
My suggestion: Read books. Most folks have libraries nearby, full of
the darn things. Many of them have mobile apps (such as the ones made by
my employer) that let you download certain of the material onto your
phone/tablet/fridge.
I saw a book just the other day. My friend Paul was reading it. The beauty
of books is that you don't have to recharge any batteries, it's easy to
bookmark pages you want to go back to, you don't have to worry about them
disappearing due to copyright disputes (as with, say, Kindle), and they
don't break if you drop them. The only downside is that backups are a bitch
to do.
And the space need for storage.

Or try taking a couple of books on a trip versus packing an e-reader.
jonz
2014-02-16 03:38:43 UTC
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Post by poldy
Post by David Kaye
Post by Eric Weaver
My suggestion: Read books. Most folks have libraries nearby, full of
the darn things. Many of them have mobile apps (such as the ones made by
my employer) that let you download certain of the material onto your
phone/tablet/fridge.
I saw a book just the other day. My friend Paul was reading it. The beauty
of books is that you don't have to recharge any batteries, it's easy to
bookmark pages you want to go back to, you don't have to worry about them
disappearing due to copyright disputes (as with, say, Kindle), and they
don't break if you drop them. The only downside is that backups are a bitch
to do.
And the space need for storage.
Or try taking a couple of books on a trip versus packing an e-reader.
+1

Or reading a book where the light is marginal or non-existent.


---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
Eli the Bearded
2014-02-15 01:10:35 UTC
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In ba.internet, Eric Weaver <***@sigma.net> wrote:
[The original post said:
Check Out How Much Of The US Market Comcast Will Control After The Time
Warner Deal
More than AT&T and Verizon combined!
http://tinyurl.com/lllw3gq
]
Post by Eric Weaver
My suggestion: Read books. Most folks have libraries nearby, full of
the darn things. Many of them have mobile apps (such as the ones made
by my employer) that let you download certain of the material onto your
phone/tablet/fridge.
The way to win the Cable game is Not To Play.
The chart there is not about how much of the "cable market" Comcast Will
Control, but how much of the "broadband internet market" Comcast Will
Control. How do you "download certain of the material" without broadband?
(Other than "slowly".)

I don't play the "cable game" but I do not like this merger.

Elijah
------
reads books regularly, too
Eric Weaver
2014-02-15 03:21:57 UTC
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Post by Eli the Bearded
The chart there is not about how much of the "cable market" Comcast Will
Control, but how much of the "broadband internet market" Comcast Will
Control. How do you "download certain of the material" without broadband?
(Other than "slowly".)
Well now thou hast a point. We who can be Sonic customers are quite
fortunate. We're kinda the 1-%ers, and annoyingly smug. So smug we put
Ronn Owens to shame.

Those who are out past 10k cable feet from a telco CO are between a rock
and a hard place when it comes to that (unless you have a really really
good cellular data plan). I would not want to download a Kindle or
Overdrive (or One Click Digital or...) e-book over most cellular plans.
Post by Eli the Bearded
I don't play the "cable game" but I do not like this merger.
Agreed.
Post by Eli the Bearded
Elijah
------
reads books regularly, too
Good on ya
David Kaye
2014-02-15 07:19:56 UTC
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Post by Eric Weaver
Well now thou hast a point. We who can be Sonic customers are quite
fortunate. We're kinda the 1-%ers, and annoyingly smug. So smug we put
Ronn Owens to shame.
In SF there is also Monkeybrains.com, which uses wireless rooftop to rooftop
transmission, and in Santa Cruz, there is Cruzio.com, but I don't know the
ins and outs of their distribution anymore.
Bhairitu
2014-02-15 20:29:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Eric Weaver
Post by Bhairitu
Post by poldy
In article
Post by Roy
Check Out How Much Of The US Market Comcast Will Control After The Time
Warner Deal
More than AT&T and Verizon combined!
http://tinyurl.com/lllw3gq
And it'll probably get approved by the administration.
Bye bye net neutrality.
Bye cord-cutters.
Nuke Comcast! The fascist pig Roberts family deserve to roast in hell or
at least arrested by DHS because they are indeed a threat to national
security. So sad what the 21st century is becoming.
My suggestion: Read books. Most folks have libraries nearby, full of
the darn things. Many of them have mobile apps (such as the ones made
by my employer) that let you download certain of the material onto your
phone/tablet/fridge.
The way to win the Cable game is Not To Play.
If you spend most of your day sitting at a computer working with text
reading a book in the evening can be hard on the eyes. A friend who is
an optometrist agrees with this. My big screen is 8' away so it is more
distant vision. Besides it's hard to be a movie buff reading books.

I cut the cable (Comcast) last fall. I get most broadcast TV shows that
are worth watching by Hulu+ (yeah, I know Comcast owns a 1/3 of them).
CBS isn't on Hulu so I use Chromecast and cast their website to the TV.
The cable network shows worth watching I just get off Amazon or Google
Play.
poldy
2014-02-16 01:05:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bhairitu
Post by Eric Weaver
Post by Bhairitu
Post by poldy
In article
Post by Roy
Check Out How Much Of The US Market Comcast Will Control After The Time
Warner Deal
More than AT&T and Verizon combined!
http://tinyurl.com/lllw3gq
And it'll probably get approved by the administration.
Bye bye net neutrality.
Bye cord-cutters.
Nuke Comcast! The fascist pig Roberts family deserve to roast in hell or
at least arrested by DHS because they are indeed a threat to national
security. So sad what the 21st century is becoming.
My suggestion: Read books. Most folks have libraries nearby, full of
the darn things. Many of them have mobile apps (such as the ones made
by my employer) that let you download certain of the material onto your
phone/tablet/fridge.
The way to win the Cable game is Not To Play.
If you spend most of your day sitting at a computer working with text
reading a book in the evening can be hard on the eyes. A friend who is
an optometrist agrees with this. My big screen is 8' away so it is more
distant vision. Besides it's hard to be a movie buff reading books.
I cut the cable (Comcast) last fall. I get most broadcast TV shows that
are worth watching by Hulu+ (yeah, I know Comcast owns a 1/3 of them).
CBS isn't on Hulu so I use Chromecast and cast their website to the TV.
The cable network shows worth watching I just get off Amazon or Google
Play.
And where do you get your Internet?

One thing talked about in this proposed merger is the number of TV
subscribers.

But the merged entity would have an even higher share of broadband
customers.

It would have a greater influence on the web.
Bhairitu
2014-02-16 21:46:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by poldy
Post by Bhairitu
Post by Eric Weaver
Post by Bhairitu
Post by poldy
In article
Post by Roy
Check Out How Much Of The US Market Comcast Will Control After The Time
Warner Deal
More than AT&T and Verizon combined!
http://tinyurl.com/lllw3gq
And it'll probably get approved by the administration.
Bye bye net neutrality.
Bye cord-cutters.
Nuke Comcast! The fascist pig Roberts family deserve to roast in hell or
at least arrested by DHS because they are indeed a threat to national
security. So sad what the 21st century is becoming.
My suggestion: Read books. Most folks have libraries nearby, full of
the darn things. Many of them have mobile apps (such as the ones made
by my employer) that let you download certain of the material onto your
phone/tablet/fridge.
The way to win the Cable game is Not To Play.
If you spend most of your day sitting at a computer working with text
reading a book in the evening can be hard on the eyes. A friend who is
an optometrist agrees with this. My big screen is 8' away so it is more
distant vision. Besides it's hard to be a movie buff reading books.
I cut the cable (Comcast) last fall. I get most broadcast TV shows that
are worth watching by Hulu+ (yeah, I know Comcast owns a 1/3 of them).
CBS isn't on Hulu so I use Chromecast and cast their website to the TV.
The cable network shows worth watching I just get off Amazon or Google
Play.
And where do you get your Internet?
AT&T U-Verse. Before AT&T it was Earthlink but the Supreme's decision
seemed to make it impossible for them to offer the upgrade I wanted to
went to AT&T DSL then U-Verse since the fiber terminates just down the
street.

I might have subscribed to Sonic but I am too far from the CO for faster
speeds.

We really don't get much choice around here do we?
Otto Pylot
2014-02-16 22:26:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bhairitu
Post by poldy
Post by Bhairitu
Post by Eric Weaver
Post by Bhairitu
Post by poldy
In article
Post by Roy
Check Out How Much Of The US Market Comcast Will Control After The Time
Warner Deal
More than AT&T and Verizon combined!
http://tinyurl.com/lllw3gq
And it'll probably get approved by the administration.
Bye bye net neutrality.
Bye cord-cutters.
Nuke Comcast! The fascist pig Roberts family deserve to roast in hell or
at least arrested by DHS because they are indeed a threat to national
security. So sad what the 21st century is becoming.
My suggestion: Read books. Most folks have libraries nearby, full of
the darn things. Many of them have mobile apps (such as the ones made
by my employer) that let you download certain of the material onto your
phone/tablet/fridge.
The way to win the Cable game is Not To Play.
If you spend most of your day sitting at a computer working with text
reading a book in the evening can be hard on the eyes. A friend who is
an optometrist agrees with this. My big screen is 8' away so it is more
distant vision. Besides it's hard to be a movie buff reading books.
I cut the cable (Comcast) last fall. I get most broadcast TV shows that
are worth watching by Hulu+ (yeah, I know Comcast owns a 1/3 of them).
CBS isn't on Hulu so I use Chromecast and cast their website to the TV.
The cable network shows worth watching I just get off Amazon or Google
Play.
And where do you get your Internet?
AT&T U-Verse. Before AT&T it was Earthlink but the Supreme's decision
seemed to make it impossible for them to offer the upgrade I wanted to
went to AT&T DSL then U-Verse since the fiber terminates just down the
street.
I might have subscribed to Sonic but I am too far from the CO for faster
speeds.
We really don't get much choice around here do we?
At 3800 copper feet from the CO, I feel very fortunate to have Sonic
Fusion. I just hope they can maintain their independence.
--
Deja Moo: I've seen this bullshit before. Please respond to: ***@invalid.net
replacing invalid with sonic.
Thad Floryan
2014-02-16 23:45:39 UTC
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Post by Bhairitu
Post by poldy
[...]
And where do you get your Internet?
AT&T U-Verse.
DSL? Meh.
Post by Bhairitu
[...]
I might have subscribed to Sonic but I am too far from the CO for faster
speeds.
We really don't get much choice around here do we?
Define "where".

Given I live in Los Altos, I was constrained to solely Sprint
Broadband (6Mpbs service) from 1998 to July 2008 when the FCC
reallocated spectrum and I lost Sprint Broadband; see setup:

http://thadlabs.com/PIX/LX200/

Fortunately for me Comcast had recently run fiber alongside
Foothill Expressway beginning where it meets I-280 and I was
able to find "Comcast Offers" to determine I could get service.
And I ended up being the first in the neighborhood and received
many freebies: free Motorola cable modem, $200 in rebates before
I even paid Comcast a penny, and some other goodies.

Here's the setup as I had it from July 2008:

Loading Image...
http://thadlabs.com/FILES/ThadLABS_network_demarc_OLD.txt

and here it is now after I completed my Gigabit LAN upgrade in
February 2013:

Loading Image...
http://thadlabs.com/FILES/ThadLABS_network_demarc.txt

This month's Comcast e-bill shows I can now get "Blast! Plus" at
50Mbps for $79.95/month. I don't have the budget for that yet but
I presently get 3.5MB/S downloads consistently for $65/month.

I'd say that at least I/we do have choices: I chose to NOT use
AT&T anything other than for my cellphone and I abandoned all
my 4 land lines in 2002.

Thad
Roy
2014-02-17 01:02:57 UTC
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Post by Thad Floryan
...
Define "where".
Given I live in Los Altos, I was constrained to solely Sprint
Broadband (6Mpbs service) from 1998 to July 2008 when the FCC
...
Really? You couldn't get a T1 line? T1s are available just about
anywhere. The cost can be a bit much.

And, of course, dialup was available. Satellite may also have been
feasible.

There are very few Internet deserts if cost is no object.
Thad Floryan
2014-02-17 01:55:56 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Roy
Post by Thad Floryan
...
Define "where".
Given I live in Los Altos, I was constrained to solely Sprint
Broadband (6Mpbs service) from 1998 to July 2008 when the FCC
reallocated spectrum and I lost Sprint Broadband; see setup:...
Really? You couldn't get a T1 line? T1s are available just about
anywhere. The cost can be a bit much.
True. My budget didn't include the cost for a T1 (or equivalent).

Sprint Broadband at 6Mbps was only $24.95/month IIRC and that's
speed equivalent to four T1 lines (at 1.5Mbps).
Post by Roy
And, of course, dialup was available.
A luxury, once sampled, becomes a necessity -- there was no way in
hell I would go back to dialup. I earned my battle scars at 110baud
dialup in the 1960s, then 300bps dialup, then 1200 dialup, then 2400
dialup, then Telebit T-2500 ~ 19.5kbps, then, circa early 1990s, two
Hayes 56kbps modems I bought over the internet from internet.com which
which located on Deer Creek Road in Palo Alto.

Sprint Broadband, at 6Mbps, ran circles around 56kbps.

In January 2000 I was asked to put a new startup, Sigaba, on the Net
in San Mateo at 2727 El Camino, literally across the street from the
PacBell CO in the 2800 block. 6Mbps DSL was a cinch and cheap. You
can see my Sigaba photos here:

Loading Image... launch party in San Fran
http://thadlabs.com/PIX/SigThad_1.jpg 2001 CES in Vegas
http://thadlabs.com/PIX/SigThad_1.jpg 2001 CES in Vegas
Post by Roy
Satellite may also have been feasible.
Feasible but expensive and with bad latency for a super-fast typist
such as myself.

Prior to discovering the Comcast Offers website (an affiliate vendor
of Comcast services), the only other alternative to Sprint Broadband
was a company placing microwave towers on the hills between El Camino
and Skyline Blvd and the cost was over $500/month which was W-A-Y
beyond my budget even when my income was 6 figures.
Post by Roy
There are very few Internet deserts if cost is no object.
And if one is not as picky if latency isn't an issue. Comcast cable
for Internet-only service (I have 3 OTA DTV setups at home for when
I seldom watch broadcast TV) has been excellent for me noting that
the entire local plant was 100% brand new in 2008 so the cables are
still in good shape and I've experienced ZERO outages and DOCSIS 3.0
has been available in my neighborhood now since 2011 IIRC -- I just
switched to DOCSIS 3.0 from DOCSIS 2.0 in early 2013 along with the
completion of my LAN gigabit upgrade.

Thad
Thad Floryan
2014-02-17 07:15:54 UTC
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Post by Thad Floryan
[...]
http://thadlabs.com/PIX/SigThad_1.jpg launch party in San Fran
http://thadlabs.com/PIX/SigThad_1.jpg 2001 CES in Vegas
http://thadlabs.com/PIX/SigThad_1.jpg 2001 CES in Vegas
[...]
Whoops.

I just returned from dinner and noticed the above blooper when I
copy'n'pasted in haste while headed to dinner; the 3 URLs should be:

http://thadlabs.com/PIX/SigThad_1.jpg 2000 launch party in SF
Loading Image... 2001 CES in Vegas
Loading Image... 2001 CES in Vegas

Folks from the NSA (yes, that NSA) joined us for the party and brought
the code rotors for the SIGABA machine -- the US' equivalent to the
German Enigma machine -- which was the only cipher system that was not
compromised during WW-II. An actual SIGABA machine, minus the rotors,
is/was still aboard the Pampanito submarine at Fisherman's Wharf in SF:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SIGABA

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enigma_machine

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Pampanito_%28SS-383%29

My formal involvement with security (besides my work at the Electronic
Defense Labs in Mountain View during the 1960s) was as VP Engineering
of Adalogic, Inc. from 1983 (the founding) until 1995 where I designed
and manufactured "security appliances" at the 5000 sq.ft plant located
on 559 Union Avenue at McGlincy Ln in Campbell CA (several blocks South
of what was known as the Pruneyard) using the Motorola MC6859 DES chip:

Loading Image...

Hmmm, per Google Earth, the building is still there at these coordinates
37°16'45.67N 121°56'9.79"W (or 37.279353 -121.936053). Operating as
"Hytek, Inc", I was also manufacturing modem power supplies for both
Racal-Vadic and Ven-Tel in the same plant.

Thad
Bhairitu
2014-02-17 19:17:56 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Thad Floryan
Post by Bhairitu
Post by poldy
[...]
And where do you get your Internet?
AT&T U-Verse.
DSL? Meh.
Missed that I said there is fiber 1/2 a block a way to service the
copper to my house?
Post by Thad Floryan
Post by Bhairitu
[...]
I might have subscribed to Sonic but I am too far from the CO for faster
speeds.
We really don't get much choice around here do we?
Define "where".
Martinez. I've already mentioned that Astound is already moving into
the town but they're not in my neighborhood yet. But they stupidly DO
cap at 300 GB. This has AT&T and Comcast constantly bugging me with
offers so I don't jump to Astound.

Like I said, not much choice. And the fastest broadband IS NOT in
Kansas, Toto. It's in Ephrata, Washington and apparently some of the
other rurul communities around there.
Marcus Allen
2014-02-17 22:04:14 UTC
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Post by Bhairitu
Martinez. I've already mentioned that Astound is already moving into
the town but they're not in my neighborhood yet. But they stupidly DO
cap at 300 GB. This has AT&T and Comcast constantly bugging me with
offers so I don't jump to Astound.
Like I said, not much choice. And the fastest broadband IS NOT in
Kansas, Toto. It's in Ephrata, Washington and apparently some of the
other rurul communities around there.
Unless I'm missing something, Google fiber in Kansas City is much faster
than Ephrata, WA. Ephrata apparently clocks in at just over 85 megabits per
second, while Google is offering full Gigabit (symmetric, even) in KC and is
talking about increasing it to 10 Gig.
Roy
2014-02-17 22:32:35 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Marcus Allen
Post by Bhairitu
Martinez. I've already mentioned that Astound is already moving into
the town but they're not in my neighborhood yet. But they stupidly DO
cap at 300 GB. This has AT&T and Comcast constantly bugging me with
offers so I don't jump to Astound.
Like I said, not much choice. And the fastest broadband IS NOT in
Kansas, Toto. It's in Ephrata, Washington and apparently some of the
other rurul communities around there.
Unless I'm missing something, Google fiber in Kansas City is much faster
than Ephrata, WA. Ephrata apparently clocks in at just over 85 megabits per
second, while Google is offering full Gigabit (symmetric, even) in KC and is
talking about increasing it to 10 Gig.
http://www.ifiberone.com/news/grantcounty/ephrata/ifiber-helps-ephrata-be-called-america-s-fastest-internet/article_0d7983b8-19b2-11e3-9104-0019bb30f31a.html

or

http://tinyurl.com/mpx84vz


“According to Gizmodo, the town of about 7,600 roughly 180 miles east of
Seattle, has America's fastest Internet download speeds, averaging 85.54
megabits per second (mps), more than twice as fast as any other town,"

Its PR hype by the company that runs the ISP
Marcus Allen
2014-02-18 02:36:48 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Roy
Post by Marcus Allen
Post by Bhairitu
Martinez. I've already mentioned that Astound is already moving into
the town but they're not in my neighborhood yet. But they stupidly DO
cap at 300 GB. This has AT&T and Comcast constantly bugging me with
offers so I don't jump to Astound.
Like I said, not much choice. And the fastest broadband IS NOT in
Kansas, Toto. It's in Ephrata, Washington and apparently some of the
other rurul communities around there.
Unless I'm missing something, Google fiber in Kansas City is much faster
than Ephrata, WA. Ephrata apparently clocks in at just over 85 megabits per
second, while Google is offering full Gigabit (symmetric, even) in KC and is
talking about increasing it to 10 Gig.
http://www.ifiberone.com/news/grantcounty/ephrata/ifiber-helps-ephrata-be-called-america-s-fastest-internet/article_0d7983b8-19b2-11e3-9104-0019bb30f31a.html
or
http://tinyurl.com/mpx84vz
“According to Gizmodo, the town of about 7,600 roughly 180 miles east of
Seattle, has America's fastest Internet download speeds, averaging 85.54
megabits per second (mps), more than twice as fast as any other town,"
Its PR hype by the company that runs the ISP
That explains it, thanks. So they are truly the fastest, except for any
other place that happens to be faster. ;-)
Roy
2014-02-18 06:03:49 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Marcus Allen
Post by Roy
Post by Marcus Allen
Post by Bhairitu
Martinez. I've already mentioned that Astound is already moving into
the town but they're not in my neighborhood yet. But they stupidly DO
cap at 300 GB. This has AT&T and Comcast constantly bugging me with
offers so I don't jump to Astound.
Like I said, not much choice. And the fastest broadband IS NOT in
Kansas, Toto. It's in Ephrata, Washington and apparently some of the
other rurul communities around there.
Unless I'm missing something, Google fiber in Kansas City is much faster
than Ephrata, WA. Ephrata apparently clocks in at just over 85 megabits per
second, while Google is offering full Gigabit (symmetric, even) in KC and is
talking about increasing it to 10 Gig.
http://www.ifiberone.com/news/grantcounty/ephrata/ifiber-helps-ephrata-be-called-america-s-fastest-internet/article_0d7983b8-19b2-11e3-9104-0019bb30f31a.html
or
http://tinyurl.com/mpx84vz
“According to Gizmodo, the town of about 7,600 roughly 180 miles east of
Seattle, has America's fastest Internet download speeds, averaging 85.54
megabits per second (mps), more than twice as fast as any other town,"
Its PR hype by the company that runs the ISP
That explains it, thanks. So they are truly the fastest, except for any
other place that happens to be faster. ;-)
"Lies, damned lies, and statistics"

The town is so small (10 sq miles) that its easy to wire up a
significant part of the town and get a high "average" speed.

A comparable size city would be Cupertino at 11.5 sq mi and a population
of 58,000

I was reading where someone was comparing Internet speeds in Hong Kong
to the US. Hong Kong is 426 sq miles and a population of 7M+. Santa
Clara County is three times bigger. No wonder why its easy to wire Hong
Kong.

You can't compare apples and oranges
Thad Floryan
2014-02-18 07:11:40 UTC
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Post by Roy
[...]
I was reading where someone was comparing Internet speeds in Hong Kong
to the US. Hong Kong is 426 sq miles and a population of 7M+. Santa
Clara County is three times bigger. No wonder why its easy to wire Hong
Kong.
[...]
Somewhere (Slashdot?) very recently I was reading about network speeds vs.
population density and the article concluded that locations with a high
population density were much easier to service with high speed broadband
since everyone is so close together -- a fact-of-life in many of the Asian
megacities and their towering (no pun) towers. This is especially true in
South Korea which arguably has the highest broadband speeds per capita.

This article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seoul shows 26 million population
with a density of 43,000/sq mi

This article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hong_Kong shows a population
density of 17,024/sq mi

This article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_Bay_Area shows a
population density of 1,023.76/sq mi

Thad
Thad Floryan
2014-02-18 07:35:43 UTC
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Post by Thad Floryan
[...]
This article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seoul shows 26 million population
with a density of 43,000/sq mi
This article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hong_Kong shows a population
density of 17,024/sq mi
This article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_Bay_Area shows a
population density of 1,023.76/sq mi
I was curious. One square mile = 27,878,399.89 (shown as 27+M below) square
feet per http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/area_conversion.php so:

27+M / 43000 = 648 sq ft per person in Seoul

27+M / 17024 = 1,637 sq ft per person in Hong Kong

27+M / 1023 = 27,251 sq ft per person in the SF Bay Area

Learn something new every day. :-)

Thad
b***@MIX.COM
2014-02-19 20:25:36 UTC
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Post by Marcus Allen
Unless I'm missing something, Google fiber in Kansas City is much faster
than Ephrata, WA. Ephrata apparently clocks in at just over 85 megabits per
second, while Google is offering full Gigabit (symmetric, even) in KC and is
talking about increasing it to 10 Gig.
I haven't found many places that fill a pipe that large. Sites using Akamai
can, though. I've also noticed some others (LA Times being one) pre-loading
tons of stuff, at about 3MB/s. That's probably a good work-aound, other than
for those with limited bandwidth who don't want a good chunk of it eaten.

Billy Y..
--
sub #'9+1 ,r0 ; convert ascii byte
add #9.+1 ,r0 ; to an integer
bcc 20$ ; not a number
Thad Floryan
2014-02-20 00:30:07 UTC
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Post by b***@MIX.COM
Post by Marcus Allen
Unless I'm missing something, Google fiber in Kansas City is much faster
than Ephrata, WA. Ephrata apparently clocks in at just over 85 megabits per
second, while Google is offering full Gigabit (symmetric, even) in KC and is
talking about increasing it to 10 Gig.
I haven't found many places that fill a pipe that large. Sites using Akamai
can, though. I've also noticed some others (LA Times being one) pre-loading
tons of stuff, at about 3MB/s. That's probably a good work-aound, other than
for those with limited bandwidth who don't want a good chunk of it eaten.
3MB/S to 3.5MB/S is what I'm getting with my Comcast cable Internet service from
well-connected sites (e.g., Stanford, Microsoft, and, surprisingly, some sites
in Europe).

Having 1Gbps/10Gbps internet (at least at home, today) is an extravagance because
most sites users visit simply cannot keep the pipe full as you wrote which is why
I haven't bothered (or can afford) to upgrade to faster Comcast DOCSIS 3.0 tiers.

DOCSIS 2.0 is the "common" cable internet service level, DOCSIS 3.0 is faster:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOCSIS

Note in the table at about halfway into the above Wikipedia article that DOCSIS 3.0
with 24 bonded channels provides gigabit [download] service:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOCSIS#Speed_tables

Here's how many bonded channels I have as of a few minutes ago:

Loading Image... 57kB

with this setup:

http://thadlabs.com/PIX/ThadLABS_network_demarc.jpg 297kB
http://thadlabs.com/FILES/ThadLABS_network_demarc.txt 2.3kB

Thad
Roy
2014-02-22 00:04:15 UTC
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Interesting argument against the merger: monopsony

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/02/21/us-usa-comcast-monopsony-analysis-idUSBREA1K1VI20140221

or

http://tinyurl.com/nlyhgux
Bhairitu
2014-02-22 20:31:12 UTC
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Post by Roy
Interesting argument against the merger: monopsony
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/02/21/us-usa-comcast-monopsony-analysis-idUSBREA1K1VI20140221
or
http://tinyurl.com/nlyhgux
The thing I bet Comcast didn't expect is their attempted merger (which
will probably be blocked or they'll drop the plan before it can be
blocked) is that discussion is now mainstream not just relegated to the
geek media.

Not only that it has raised the discussion of Netflix throttling to
mainstream and not just the geek media.

The public isn't happy and we need to help educate them about the rather
questionable legislation in states to make municipal fiber illegal.
Roy
2014-02-23 07:05:26 UTC
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Post by Bhairitu
Post by Roy
Interesting argument against the merger: monopsony
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/02/21/us-usa-comcast-monopsony-analysis-idUSBREA1K1VI20140221
or
http://tinyurl.com/nlyhgux
The thing I bet Comcast didn't expect is their attempted merger (which
will probably be blocked or they'll drop the plan before it can be
blocked) is that discussion is now mainstream not just relegated to the
geek media.
Not only that it has raised the discussion of Netflix throttling to
mainstream and not just the geek media.
The public isn't happy and we need to help educate them about the rather
questionable legislation in states to make municipal fiber illegal.
Netflix is being "throttled" by their main ISP (Cogent) and its
connections to the rest of the world. Other ISPs like Verizon say
Cogent needs to pay to increase the capacity and Cogent says it should
be free. Cogent has a long history of fighting with other ISPs over
interconnection capacity.

Here is an article about the current impasse

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/02/netflix-packets-being-dropped-every-day-because-verizon-wants-more-money/

or

http://tinyurl.com/pk8cshu

Kevin McMurtrie
2014-02-14 05:37:52 UTC
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In article
Post by Roy
Check Out How Much Of The US Market Comcast Will Control After The Time
Warner Deal
More than AT&T and Verizon combined!
http://tinyurl.com/lllw3gq
Time Warner and Comcast have always been careful to not compete so a
merger changes nothing. There wasn't any consumer choice to start with.
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