Discussion:
xfinity wifi
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David Arnstein
2014-08-05 23:33:00 UTC
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I recall that David Kaye has reported good results using XFINITI WiFi
hotspots. I am happy for David K., but puzzled that my experience is
so different.

Generally speaking, I am pleased with my Verizon iPhone. Occasionally
it fucks up, exhibiting some hellish combination of slow transfer
speeds, intermittent function, and ridiculous latency. Most of the
time, I find that I am connected to XFINITY WiFi. I disable WiFi on my
iPhone and the problem is solved.

The two locations that I specifically remember are Santa Cruz Ave. in
Menlo Park, and University Ave. in Palo Alto.
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Steve Pope
2014-08-05 23:46:21 UTC
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Post by David Arnstein
I recall that David Kaye has reported good results using XFINITI WiFi
hotspots. I am happy for David K., but puzzled that my experience is
so different.
Generally speaking, I am pleased with my Verizon iPhone. Occasionally
it fucks up, exhibiting some hellish combination of slow transfer
speeds, intermittent function, and ridiculous latency. Most of the
time, I find that I am connected to XFINITY WiFi. I disable WiFi on my
iPhone and the problem is solved.
The two locations that I specifically remember are Santa Cruz Ave. in
Menlo Park, and University Ave. in Palo Alto.
One possibility is that your phone's WiFi is not making it through
the Xfinity splash screen, but some other level of the phone's software
thinks (incorrectly) the WiFi connection is able to transport data.

A second possibility is that the phone is (correctly) trying
to use its mobile data but the WiFi radio is interfering with
the mobile data.

Steve
David Arnstein
2014-08-06 18:37:16 UTC
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Post by Steve Pope
One possibility is that your phone's WiFi is not making it through
the Xfinity splash screen, but some other level of the phone's software
thinks (incorrectly) the WiFi connection is able to transport data.
A second possibility is that the phone is (correctly) trying
to use its mobile data but the WiFi radio is interfering with
the mobile data.
Steve and others have posted much technical info about WiFi radios in
cell phones. I don't think this is a cell phone hardware issue. I use
WiFi on my cell phone, a lot. It works great with
- my home network
- my office "guest" network (multiple radios)
- many restaurants (Denny's is the exception).
- airliners (three good experiences with US Airways Gogo)

Each time my iPhone connects to an Xfiniti WiFi radio, it is awful. I
really think that David Kaye and I just inhabit different locations
and therefore connect to different radios.
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David Arnstein (00)
arnstein+***@pobox.com {{ }}
^^
David Kaye
2014-08-06 04:39:56 UTC
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Post by David Arnstein
I recall that David Kaye has reported good results using XFINITI WiFi
hotspots. I am happy for David K., but puzzled that my experience is
so different.
Remember that I am using a tablet, not a phone, so my only data experience
is with xfinitywifi hotspots. I'd suspect that since you're using a phone
there might be some interference between use of the wifi and of your phone's
data system. Just conjecture on my part, being no expert on cell phone data
systems.




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(null)
2014-08-06 05:28:19 UTC
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Post by David Kaye
Post by David Arnstein
I recall that David Kaye has reported good results using XFINITI WiFi
hotspots. I am happy for David K., but puzzled that my experience is
so different.
Remember that I am using a tablet, not a phone
Bigger device = bigger antenna&battery? I don't suppose hotspots are using .11n?
David Kaye
2014-08-06 15:22:38 UTC
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Bigger device = bigger antenna&battery? I don't suppose hotspots are using .11n?
In the microwave spectrum antenna length is so small that a tablet and a
phone should have the same size antenna, assuming a 1/4 wave dipole.




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Steve Pope
2014-08-06 16:35:35 UTC
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Post by David Kaye
In the microwave spectrum antenna length is so small that a tablet and a
phone should have the same size antenna, assuming a 1/4 wave dipole.
Modern WiFi devices use multiple antennas -- even
the earliest ones used two, and three or four is routine.
It's basically space-limited. I suspect pads have a bigger antenna
array than phones, and I have noticed they have better WiFi connectivity.

Steve
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