Discussion:
Router Recommendations?
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David Kaye
2014-05-05 20:54:57 UTC
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I'm going to have to install 3 or 4 wireless routers to extend a hotel
network. I'm looking for a maintenance-free router that can be mounted
upside down on a ceiling (so it must have screw slots) and will be stable
enough that it doesn't have to be reset even if the ambient temperature
reaches 85.

I'm liking the specs on the Cisco RV110W, but I don't know if it has screw
holes or not.

Recommendations?

It's an interesting setup by the way. Modem to office router (which
provides DHCP), then to switch. Switch outputs to 4 routers (one for each
floor) and a couple computers and printer for customer use. (This service
is totally different from the hotel's business network.)

These new routers will connect to the existing routers on each floor to
extend their range to the extremities of the floors. Thankfully, the
floor/ceiling signal blockage is not great, so the signal can go vertical
just fine, eliminating the need for 2 routers on each floor. I'm pretty
sure 3 would work, maybe 4.

Service to be moved up to 75 Mbps Comcast business class service from anemic
5 Mbps AT&T. Given that there are dozens of router signals present on the
floors of the hotel from other buildings nearby, my NetStumbler program
shows very little noise and very consistent signals from the existing
routers in the hotel.





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Roy
2014-05-05 22:00:11 UTC
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It sounds like you want access points and not routers.

I recommend Ubiquiti for access points. The Unifi series is very good
for applications like this but you need to have a computer to operate
the network. They have duo band models too.

My other recommendation would be Mikrotik routers but set up as access
points. The RB951Ui-2HnD is popular. I don't have one here to see if
they have screw mounts but other models do. I could check. If you want
a professional looking installation, look at this neat gizmo

http://www.rfelements.com/en/products/enclosures/stationbox-inspot/

Roy
Post by David Kaye
I'm going to have to install 3 or 4 wireless routers to extend a hotel
network. I'm looking for a maintenance-free router that can be mounted
upside down on a ceiling (so it must have screw slots) and will be stable
enough that it doesn't have to be reset even if the ambient temperature
reaches 85.
I'm liking the specs on the Cisco RV110W, but I don't know if it has screw
holes or not.
Recommendations?
It's an interesting setup by the way. Modem to office router (which
provides DHCP), then to switch. Switch outputs to 4 routers (one for each
floor) and a couple computers and printer for customer use. (This service
is totally different from the hotel's business network.)
These new routers will connect to the existing routers on each floor to
extend their range to the extremities of the floors. Thankfully, the
floor/ceiling signal blockage is not great, so the signal can go vertical
just fine, eliminating the need for 2 routers on each floor. I'm pretty
sure 3 would work, maybe 4.
Service to be moved up to 75 Mbps Comcast business class service from anemic
5 Mbps AT&T. Given that there are dozens of router signals present on the
floors of the hotel from other buildings nearby, my NetStumbler program
shows very little noise and very consistent signals from the existing
routers in the hotel.
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David Kaye
2014-05-07 02:45:51 UTC
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Post by Roy
It sounds like you want access points and not routers.
A router with DHCP turned off and connected to the main router via a LAN
port instead of a WAN port is an access point, but it's still a router. It
looks like a router.
Post by Roy
If you want a professional looking installation, look at this neat gizmo
http://www.rfelements.com/en/products/enclosures/stationbox-inspot/
Cute! I'll look into it, though I am worried that the enclosure could cause
an overheating problem. It is amazing how heat rises in hallways in
buildings without air conditioning (which is most of SF).




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Roy
2014-05-07 05:34:32 UTC
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Post by David Kaye
Post by Roy
It sounds like you want access points and not routers.
A router with DHCP turned off and connected to the main router via a LAN
port instead of a WAN port is an access point, but it's still a router. It
looks like a router.
Sorry for the confusion. I think of these things by what function they
are performing and not what the box's capability is. I have Mikrotiks
that route, bridge, and switch all in one box and keeping the functions
straight helps in network design and maintenance.

I use the terminology that if you are using a wireless unit in bridge
mode, its an access point.

If you are using the routing function (WAN, LAN, separate IP subnets)
then I call that a router.
Post by David Kaye
Post by Roy
If you want a professional looking installation, look at this neat gizmo
http://www.rfelements.com/en/products/enclosures/stationbox-inspot/
Cute! I'll look into it, though I am worried that the enclosure could cause
an overheating problem. It is amazing how heat rises in hallways in
buildings without air conditioning (which is most of SF).
You might want to avoid a ceiling mount. Use a wall mount so heat from
the box can rise. If you put the box down about a foot from the
ceiling, you can probably save a few degrees. The Mikrotik RB951 I
mentioned is rated to 50C (122F) and only consumes 7 watts.

The Mikrotik power supply is a wallwart so heat from it would be away
from the unit. You can even power the Mikrotik box via POE so you can
reboot it remotely.
Post by David Kaye
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Keith Keller
2014-05-07 06:08:51 UTC
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Post by Roy
Post by David Kaye
A router with DHCP turned off and connected to the main router via a LAN
port instead of a WAN port is an access point, but it's still a router. It
looks like a router.
Sorry for the confusion.
You should not apologize for another's confusion.

--keith
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kkeller-***@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
(try just my userid to email me)
AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
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David Kaye
2014-05-07 20:52:59 UTC
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Post by Keith Keller
You should not apologize for another's confusion.
--keith
Why the troll? What have I ever done to you?




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Steve Pope
2014-05-07 18:04:42 UTC
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Post by Roy
Sorry for the confusion. I think of these things by what function they
are performing and not what the box's capability is. I have Mikrotiks
that route, bridge, and switch all in one box and keeping the functions
straight helps in network design and maintenance.
I use the terminology that if you are using a wireless unit in bridge
mode, its an access point.
If you are using the routing function (WAN, LAN, separate IP subnets)
then I call that a router.
A bridge and an access point both function at layer two but not at
higher layers. However, an access point is specifically only a wireless
LAN function. A bare access point would permit associated WLAN stations
to communicate, but not with a larger network.

So you're really describing a wireless bridge, not an accesss point,
although in practice the distinction may be meaningless.

You're correct that if there are no layer 3 functions it's not a router.
Whereas DHCP operates above layer 4.


Steve
David Kaye
2014-05-07 20:51:59 UTC
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Post by Roy
You might want to avoid a ceiling mount. Use a wall mount so heat from
the box can rise. If you put the box down about a foot from the ceiling,
you can probably save a few degrees. The Mikrotik RB951 I mentioned is
rated to 50C (122F) and only consumes 7 watts.
The customer wants ceiling mounts because they're less likely to be tampered
with.
Post by Roy
The Mikrotik power supply is a wallwart so heat from it would be away from
the unit. You can even power the Mikrotik box via POE so you can reboot
it remotely.
But there's the unit iself. I have a Buffalo right beside me and the unit
itself gets warm, not very warm, and certainly not as warm as previous
Linksys and Netgear routers I've had, but warm all the same.




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Roy
2014-05-07 22:53:03 UTC
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Post by David Kaye
...
But there's the unit iself. I have a Buffalo right beside me and the unit
itself gets warm, not very warm, and certainly not as warm as previous
Linksys and Netgear routers I've had, but warm all the same.
I just was configuring a new Mikrotik RB951Ui-2HnD. I don't detect any
difference to ambient. Admittedly, the radio was only sending its SSID.
Could have something to do with the vents on both sides

I did check and it does have some channels for screws on the bottom.
David Kaye
2014-05-08 06:24:16 UTC
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Post by Roy
I just was configuring a new Mikrotik RB951Ui-2HnD. I don't detect any
difference to ambient. Admittedly, the radio was only sending its SSID.
Could have something to do with the vents on both sides
Thanks.
Post by Roy
I did check and it does have some channels for screws on the bottom.
Thanks again! I'll look into it.




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Tim Pozar
2014-05-25 20:15:05 UTC
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I know I am a little late in responding as I *rarely* look at USENET newsgroups of late.

Best home/SOHO router I have found of late is UBNT's EdgeRouter boxes. The LTE box (3 port) runs $99 list and the regular router with PoE (5 ports) runs $175.

I have a GigE connection at work and have an LTE box doing NAT. It does a *full* Gig doing NAT. Screaming fast router. The feature set is too long to post here. It can take a bit of learning curve to configure via the GUI but they have "Wizards" that help you out. There is also a CLI you can used based on Vyatta.

Highly recommend this box.

Tim
Post by David Kaye
Post by Roy
I just was configuring a new Mikrotik RB951Ui-2HnD. I don't detect any
difference to ambient. Admittedly, the radio was only sending its SSID.
Could have something to do with the vents on both sides
Thanks.
Post by Roy
I did check and it does have some channels for screws on the bottom.
Thanks again! I'll look into it.
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