Discussion:
AT&T ends Internet Preferences for Gigapower
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poldy
2016-09-30 18:13:28 UTC
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"Since AT&T introduced Internet Preferences for its GigaPower fiber
Internet service in 2013, customers had to opt into the traffic scanning
program in order to receive the lowest available rate. Customers who
wanted more privacy had to pay another $29 a month for standalone
Internet access; bundles including TV or phone service could cost more
than $60 extra when customers didn't opt in.

AT&T’s plan to watch your Web browsing—and what you can do about it
The lowest price depends on how much competition is in each city. AT&T
tended to match Google Fiber's $70 price for gigabit Internet in cities
where both ISPs operate, while charging more elsewhere. Last year, AT&T
customers outside Google Fiber areas had to pay an extra $40 a month,
even with Internet Preferences enabled, though more recently it's been
an extra $20."

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2016/09/att-to-end-targeted-ads-program-give-all-users-lowest-available-price/


So they've supposedly had Gigapower in Cupertino for a couple of years
but not at my address apparently. Maybe they cherry-picked a couple of
subdivisions to say they were in the city and then stopped deployment.

Or maybe because Google Fiber isn't doing anything in most of the Bay
Area, they figured why worry?


But now they're pushing Uverse and Direct TV packages and the Uverse
data simply isn't competitive with Comcast at comparable prices.

Meanwhile, there are rumors they will start an OTT TV package and
possibly have that become their main way of delivering TV rather than
the satellite dish.

Guess they're going to stop Uverse TV at some point.
John Slade
2016-10-03 20:07:53 UTC
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Post by poldy
AT&T’s plan to watch your Web browsing—and what you can do about it
Well, not much. And it's not just AT&T. Law enforcement
in America can watch your web browsing pretty much at will. This
is including encrypted traffic via VPNs and the like. What I've
noticed is that many VPNs have letters and numbers only
requirement for passwords. There are some exceptions and other
methods that can slow down and possibly stop snooping.

John

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Roy
2016-10-03 21:20:04 UTC
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Post by poldy
AT&T’s plan to watch your Web browsing—and what you can do about it
Well, not much. And it's not just AT&T. Law enforcement in America
can watch your web browsing pretty much at will. This is including
encrypted traffic via VPNs and the like. What I've noticed is that many
VPNs have letters and numbers only requirement for passwords. There are
some exceptions and other methods that can slow down and possibly stop
snooping.
John
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This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
For most modern implementations, the VPN password is only used to
authenticate you to the server. The actual VPN is secured by a key
exchange during the connection setup.

If you want a "passwordless" free VPN system, try VPNGate

http://www.vpngate.net/en/

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