Discussion:
Lanminds, also DSL wireless modem / router question
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Steve Pope
2016-01-17 03:51:21 UTC
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A couple questions.

I've been using ATT DSL and Sonic DSL on two copper lines each
with its own POTS phone number.

They behave somewhat differently, with no clear winner of the
two, and I'd like to keep both lines and both DSL services
going, but I am growing tired of ATT's high prices.

So, I see LanMinds in Berkeley still exists. Any recent experience?
If they're still operating, if should be straightforward. Pricing
is about the same as Sonic, but I like to have two different
providers for redundancy.

Second question regards equipment. I'd like to ditch the very-old
ATT-supplied modem and aging router and buy a modern unit that is
reasonably future-proof. Perusing specs it seems like the TP-Link
Archer D9 would be nice. I like that is has the fastest 11.ac modes,
and both USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 ports (for shared printer and drive
respectively). Such an arrangement should (one would hope!) really
support streaming media from the attached USB drive to the endpoints.

(Our four endpoits will be b/g/n/a/ac in one instance,
b/g/n/a in two instances and b/g/n for the fourth instance.)

But the price... $195 ... seems quite high. Maybe some of
the components are not yet in mass production, or something.
Are there other units to consider?

(Another consideration is I'd like the modem/wifi router to have
low-ish operating power when it's not being tasked for full speed.)

Thanks for any input.

Steve
David Arnstein
2016-01-17 05:05:30 UTC
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Post by Steve Pope
Second question regards equipment. I'd like to ditch the very-old
ATT-supplied modem and aging router and buy a modern unit that is
reasonably future-proof. Perusing specs it seems like the TP-Link
Archer D9 would be nice. I like that is has the fastest 11.ac modes,
and both USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 ports (for shared printer and drive
respectively). Such an arrangement should (one would hope!) really
support streaming media from the attached USB drive to the endpoints.
I would suggest deploying a separate modem and router. I like Asus
RT-AC68[PUWR] router because it works well, and it is mostly open source.
You can compile most of the software yourself and there are several
projects that do just that.

The fact that many eyes are looking at the source code give me confidence
in it. I am also having a good experience with my RT-AC68P.

The Archer D9 is also a good choice. My understanding is that anything
faster than AC1900 is mostly a waste of money. This is because the client
devices (smartphones, tablets, computers, ...) do not yet have the
hardware needed to take advantage of AC2600, AC3100, or AC5300 (really!).

smallnetbuilder.com has good info and a very active forum.
--
David Arnstein (00)
arnstein+***@pobox.com {{ }}
^^
Steve Pope
2016-01-17 13:09:52 UTC
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Post by David Arnstein
I would suggest deploying a separate modem and router. I like Asus
RT-AC68[PUWR] router because it works well, and it is mostly open source.
You can compile most of the software yourself and there are several
projects that do just that.
The fact that many eyes are looking at the source code give me confidence
in it. I am also having a good experience with my RT-AC68P.
The Archer D9 is also a good choice. My understanding is that anything
faster than AC1900 is mostly a waste of money. This is because the client
devices (smartphones, tablets, computers, ...) do not yet have the
hardware needed to take advantage of AC2600, AC3100, or AC5300 (really!).
smallnetbuilder.com has good info and a very active forum.
David -- thanks, I will look into these suggestions.

Steve
default
2016-01-18 02:02:58 UTC
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Post by David Arnstein
Post by Steve Pope
Second question regards equipment. I'd like to ditch the very-old
ATT-supplied modem and aging router and buy a modern unit that is
reasonably future-proof.
"future-proof"? I'm not sure that's a practical goal when it comes to
technology, because it changes so fast. Does it mean anticipating your
needs two years hence? You'd be a better guesser than me for that to
work? In two years you might decide (or be forced) to go to cable
Internet. The endpoint devices you want to use or find on the market may
be quite different than today.
Post by David Arnstein
I would suggest deploying a separate modem and router.
I concur with this concept, for several reasons. Downside is more wires
adding to the typical rat's nest. For me the advantages outweigh that.
But another downside is potentially higher power consumption for separate
units, and you seem to be sensitive to that. To be really sure, you
should check the actual specs on the models you are considering and add
them up.

You may find you don't need a new modem. For standard ADSL I think an old
one is fine. Just use a newer router for the wifi speed. (If the current
"modem" is actually a combination unit, you might save power by using a
modem-only device. They are available free from people that have dumped
their DSL for cable:-)


I like Asus
Post by David Arnstein
RT-AC68[PUWR] router because it works well, and it is mostly open source.
You can compile most of the software yourself and there are several
projects that do just that.
The fact that many eyes are looking at the source code give me
confidence in it. I am also having a good experience with my RT-AC68P.
Generally I like open-source and replaceable firmware. A big advantage
for me is if a problem is discovered in a router firmware, you aren't
entirely at the mercy of the manufacturer to fix it. Some don't, or are
very slow.

I know installing your own firmware is not for everyone.

Sorry I can't help you with more specific model numbers.
Steve Pope
2016-01-18 19:49:38 UTC
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Post by default
Post by David Arnstein
Post by Steve Pope
Second question regards equipment. I'd like to ditch the very-old
ATT-supplied modem and aging router and buy a modern unit that is
reasonably future-proof.
"future-proof"? I'm not sure that's a practical goal when it comes to
technology, because it changes so fast.
I was using the phrase very loosely.
Post by default
Post by David Arnstein
I would suggest deploying a separate modem and router.
I concur with this concept, for several reasons. Downside is more wires
adding to the typical rat's nest. For me the advantages outweigh that.
But another downside is potentially higher power consumption for separate
units, and you seem to be sensitive to that. To be really sure, you
should check the actual specs on the models you are considering and add
them up.
Yes; what I'd like is very low idle power, and reasonably low power
for moderate usage. I'll have to dig into the details of what
I'm buying.

(I believe the TP-Link A9 has a WAN port that allows it to be used
as just a router, should I at some point switch to Cable or LTE for
my feed.)
Post by default
You may find you don't need a new modem. For standard ADSL I think an old
one is fine.
As background, I have been facing too-frequent AFCI interruptions,
am decommissioning some of the older loads on the affected
branches, and this particular modem and router falls into that category.

Steve
Tak Nakamoto
2016-01-19 19:40:45 UTC
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"Steve Pope" wrote

So, I see LanMinds in Berkeley still exists. Any recent experience?
If they're still operating, if should be straightforward. Pricing
is about the same as Sonic, but I like to have two different
providers for redundancy.

_____________

Lanminds now operates as lmi.net. I'm curious as to what you find out about
them. They appear to providing ADSL2 service to their area + phone for
prices comparable to Sonic Fusion.

http://www.lmi.net/services/phlo
http://www.lmi.net/services/phlo-faq

If the service actually lives up to what is claimed, it is a lot faster than
what I'm getting from my Fusion line. (I'm getting 1.5Mbps download from
Sonic, which is not great at all even for plain DSL. But it is much more
stable than what I was getting from Earthlink over the same copper wires.)

Given their history, I had concerns about LMI's stability as a long term
provider. I'm hoping that Sonic Fiber will get to our neighborhood in West
Berkeley soon.

Tak Nakamoto
Steve Pope
2016-01-19 20:02:12 UTC
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Post by Tak Nakamoto
Lanminds now operates as lmi.net. I'm curious as to what you find out about
them. They appear to providing ADSL2 service to their area + phone for
prices comparable to Sonic Fusion.
http://www.lmi.net/services/phlo
http://www.lmi.net/services/phlo-faq
If the service actually lives up to what is claimed, it is a lot faster than
what I'm getting from my Fusion line. (I'm getting 1.5Mbps download from
Sonic, which is not great at all even for plain DSL. But it is much more
stable than what I was getting from Earthlink over the same copper wires.)
Hm... I see 7 to 8 mbps download speeds from Sonic, and according to
LMI's site, I'm 6000 feet from the old PacBell Berkeley Central
Office. I think you are further away than me.
Post by Tak Nakamoto
Given their history, I had concerns about LMI's stability as a long term
provider. I'm hoping that Sonic Fiber will get to our neighborhood in West
Berkeley soon.
Yes, I am a bit concernted that I will somehow lose my copper line
if LMI goes out of business.

Steve

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