Discussion:
Advice for a 10/100/1000 Router?
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David Kaye
2017-07-12 08:30:44 UTC
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Looking for a router, not a switch that handles 10/100/1000, preferably
TP-Link (my favorite), but otherwise I'd consider another reliable
manufacturer.

It can be wireless as well, but I won't be using the wireless part.

Seems that a lot of the routers out there max out at 300 for Ethernet,
though their wi-fi parts can go much faster.

Ideas anyone?

--dk
roy
2017-07-13 14:00:19 UTC
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I use Mikrotik equipment. The prices are good. There are various
models with different capabilities including some monsters all running
the same software. Upgrades are free.

The do have a basic setup mode which can be used by anyone and come from
the factory ready to go.

They have lots of capabilities and configuring some of them can get very
complex. Example would be having multiple ISPs connected. This sort of
task is not for the average consumer.

The hEX (RB750Gr3) model will route over 1Gbps and list for $60.

https://routerboard.com/RB750Gr3

PS. I have deployed hundreds of these. Each one connects to my central
node so I can maintain them all remotely.
Post by David Kaye
Looking for a router, not a switch that handles 10/100/1000, preferably
TP-Link (my favorite), but otherwise I'd consider another reliable
manufacturer.
It can be wireless as well, but I won't be using the wireless part.
Seems that a lot of the routers out there max out at 300 for Ethernet,
though their wi-fi parts can go much faster.
Ideas anyone?
--dk
David Kaye
2017-07-13 21:21:14 UTC
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I use Mikrotik equipment. The prices are good. There are various models
with different capabilities including some monsters all running the same
software. Upgrades are free.
Thanks; I'll take a look.

Jeff Liebermann
2017-07-13 15:58:09 UTC
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On Wed, 12 Jul 2017 01:30:44 -0700, "David Kaye"
Post by David Kaye
Looking for a router, not a switch that handles 10/100/1000, preferably
TP-Link (my favorite), but otherwise I'd consider another reliable
manufacturer.
It can be wireless as well, but I won't be using the wireless part.
Seems that a lot of the routers out there max out at 300 for Ethernet,
though their wi-fi parts can go much faster.
That's because all Wi-Fi and ethernet is done on IP Layer 2, while
routing is done on Layer 3. It takes more horsepower to route by IP
than to switch by MAC address.
Post by David Kaye
Ideas anyone?
Sorry, but without knowing the number of ports, your estimated total
bandwidth, and options required (cost limit, firewall complexity,
number of MAC addresses, SNMP level, port control, bandwidth
management, etc), I can't offer a recommendation.

If it's potentially messy, think about a PC based router:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_router_and_firewall_distributions>
I've used pfSense, but mostly as a learning exercise.
--
Jeff Liebermann ***@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
roy
2017-07-13 20:31:54 UTC
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Post by Jeff Liebermann
...
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_router_and_firewall_distributions>
I've used pfSense, but mostly as a learning exercise.
Mikrotik's RouterOS runs on x86 too.
David Kaye
2017-07-13 21:20:23 UTC
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Post by Jeff Liebermann
Sorry, but without knowing the number of ports, your estimated total
bandwidth, and options required (cost limit, firewall complexity,
number of MAC addresses, SNMP level, port control, bandwidth
management, etc), I can't offer a recommendation.
Just upgrading from 300Mb to 1Gb for service to a wi-fi AP. I think Roy has
a good answer, so I'll look into that.
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