Discussion:
home server options
(too old to reply)
Shawn
2014-11-25 01:47:27 UTC
Permalink
I currently have dslextreme (zip code 95117) behind a RT so fun things
like Fusion are not an option (plus I have AT&T home phone and DirecTV).

They allow me to run servers from my home machine (sshd, httpd, smtpd,
named). My usage is pretty low but it's above 0.

I'd like to upgrade to something different (really, to bundle home
phone/internet/tv to reduce costs) but I've heard neither AT&T nor Comcast
allow servers to run (they block the ports?).

Is that true? Are there ways around this? I believe Comcast has a more
expensive business level which would allow this at a cost which may
prevent it from being a better deal. Does AT&T have an option for
servers?

In theory, I could outsource httpd/mail to a co-location box but I'll want
to keep sshd access to my home network. Would that be a problem with
AT&T/Comcast or is that allowed? Would that even be a financially viable
option?

Thanks for your insight!

Shawn
Steve Pope
2014-11-25 07:25:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shawn
I currently have dslextreme (zip code 95117) behind a RT so fun things
like Fusion are not an option (plus I have AT&T home phone and DirecTV).
They allow me to run servers from my home machine (sshd, httpd, smtpd,
named). My usage is pretty low but it's above 0.
I'd like to upgrade to something different (really, to bundle home
phone/internet/tv to reduce costs) but I've heard neither AT&T nor Comcast
allow servers to run (they block the ports?).
Is that true? Are there ways around this?
You may be able to use a VPN provider that allows servers.
I have not done this personally, but I believe it's possible,
and VPN providers typically run under $10/month.

So a bundle from Comcast or AT&T plus a VPN provider might
be a relatively low-cost way to go.

Another way to lower costs is to drop your wired TV service
(wireless DTV being free, and depending on your location and
usage requirements, may be about as good).

Also, as you mention, using a cheap co-location service may
work, and you could set up a tunnel that will effectively let you ssh
into your local site.

Steve
Julian Macassey
2014-11-25 08:16:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shawn
I currently have dslextreme (zip code 95117) behind a RT so fun things
like Fusion are not an option (plus I have AT&T home phone and DirecTV).
They allow me to run servers from my home machine (sshd, httpd, smtpd,
named). My usage is pretty low but it's above 0.
I'd like to upgrade to something different (really, to bundle home
phone/internet/tv to reduce costs) but I've heard neither AT&T nor Comcast
allow servers to run (they block the ports?).
When did being an ISP start to mean you block ports?

sonic and others will allow you to use the internet, not just
http.

Scumcast - Give us the money and shut up. No you can't
usnsubscribe.
--
Germany is known as 'the land where Israelis learned their manners'.
- P. J. O'Rourke
Rob Warnock
2014-11-25 10:23:05 UTC
Permalink
Julian Macassey <***@tele.com> wrote:
+---------------
| When did being an ISP start to mean you block ports?
| sonic and others will allow you to use the internet, not just http.
+---------------

Even Sonic blocks outgoing port 25 unless it's to *their*
mail relays or unless you're using a static IP address for
your machine:

https://wiki.sonic.net/wiki/Port_25

...[Long/good explanation of why most ISPs
now block port 25]...

Does Sonic.net block port 25?

Yes, we block port 25 on all of our dynamic dial-up and
broadband customers. Port 25 is left open on static-IP Fusion
circuits, and can be opened on static-IP ADSL1 circuits.

One static IP is a free option with Fusion, but it's a bit
tricky to run a mail [or any other] server if you also want
to use the default [read: required] modem/router/WiFi that
comes with Fusion. However, for an extra $10/month, they'll
allocate four static IPs for you, and then things get a *lot*
simpler to configure [see the "LAN Subports" feature].

I have Fusion, with the four static IPs option, and run my own
DNS, HTTP (web), SMTP (mail), SSH, and NTP servers. Works fine.


-Rob

-----
Rob Warnock <***@rpw3.org>
627 26th Avenue <http://rpw3.org/>
San Mateo, CA 94403
Julian Macassey
2014-11-25 15:23:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rob Warnock
+---------------
| When did being an ISP start to mean you block ports?
| sonic and others will allow you to use the internet, not just http.
+---------------
Even Sonic blocks outgoing port 25 unless it's to *their*
mail relays or unless you're using a static IP address for
https://wiki.sonic.net/wiki/Port_25
...[Long/good explanation of why most ISPs
now block port 25]...
Does Sonic.net block port 25?
Yes, we block port 25 on all of our dynamic dial-up and
broadband customers. Port 25 is left open on static-IP Fusion
circuits, and can be opened on static-IP ADSL1 circuits.
If you want to run a server of any kind it makes sense to use
a static IP anyhow. I always use a static IP. DHCP only makes sense
if you are in an itinerent situation.
Post by Rob Warnock
One static IP is a free option with Fusion, but it's a bit
tricky to run a mail [or any other] server if you also want
to use the default [read: required] modem/router/WiFi that
comes with Fusion. However, for an extra $10/month, they'll
allocate four static IPs for you, and then things get a *lot*
simpler to configure [see the "LAN Subports" feature].
I have used a single IP with DSL and now have four, so I can
do other things.
Post by Rob Warnock
I have Fusion, with the four static IPs option, and run my own
DNS, HTTP (web), SMTP (mail), SSH, and NTP servers. Works fine.
I do pretty much the same and have been doing so for decades.
--
I regret to say that we of the FBI are powerless to act in cases of
oral-genital intimacy, unless it has in some way obstructed interstate
commerce. - J. Edgar Hoover
Shawn
2014-11-25 17:58:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Julian Macassey
Post by Rob Warnock
I have Fusion, with the four static IPs option, and run my own
DNS, HTTP (web), SMTP (mail), SSH, and NTP servers. Works fine.
I do pretty much the same and have been doing so for decades.
I can't get Fusion at my location - if I could, we wouldn't be having this
discussion :)

Shawn
Steve Pope
2014-11-25 18:52:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shawn
I can't get Fusion at my location - if I could, we wouldn't be having this
discussion :)
Correct, you can't get Fusion because you are behind an RT.

You could get Sonic DSL, but not Sonic Fusion, but it would probably
be costlier than what you have now.

There is a remote chance you could drop the ATT voice telelphone
and keep your DSL provider, porting the phone number to a cheap
cell service. This could save significant money, but it's one
of the riskier options.


Steve
d***@99.usenet.us.com
2014-11-26 00:44:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shawn
I can't get Fusion at my location - if I could, we wouldn't be having this
discussion :)
For 20 years, I've been thinking about switching to Sonic.
I just moved to Santa Rosa, thought I was finally going to do it.
No Fusion ;-(
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
Steve Pope
2014-11-26 02:25:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@99.usenet.us.com
For 20 years, I've been thinking about switching to Sonic.
I just moved to Santa Rosa, thought I was finally going to do it.
No Fusion ;-(
You deliberately moved to a place with no Fusion? What were
you thinking?


Steve
Rob Warnock
2014-11-26 02:38:33 UTC
Permalink
Steve Pope <***@speedymail.org> wrote:
+---------------
| <***@99.usenet.us.com> wrote:
| >For 20 years, I've been thinking about switching to Sonic.
| >I just moved to Santa Rosa, thought I was finally going to do it.
| >No Fusion ;-(
|
| You deliberately moved to a place with no Fusion?
| What were you thinking?
+---------------

He was probably thinking that since Sonic's headquarters
are in Santa Rosa, why of *course* he'd be able to get Fusion.
(*sigh*)


-Rob

-----
Rob Warnock <***@rpw3.org>
627 26th Avenue <http://rpw3.org/>
San Mateo, CA 94403
d***@99.usenet.us.com
2014-12-02 05:58:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Pope
Post by d***@99.usenet.us.com
For 20 years, I've been thinking about switching to Sonic.
I just moved to Santa Rosa, thought I was finally going to do it.
No Fusion ;-(
You deliberately moved to a place with no Fusion? What were
you thinking?
I misread the "qualification". I actually did check before I bought.
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
Steve Pope
2014-12-02 06:04:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@99.usenet.us.com
Post by Steve Pope
You deliberately moved to a place with no Fusion? What were
you thinking?
I misread the "qualification". I actually did check before I bought.
Understand.


S.
(null)
2014-11-28 14:15:04 UTC
Permalink
In article <m537pm$had$***@blue-new.rahul.net>, <***@99.usenet.us.com> wrote:
" Shawn <***@gmail.com> wrote:
" > I can't get Fusion at my location - if I could, we wouldn't be
" > having this discussion :)
"
" For 20 years, I've been thinking about switching to Sonic.
" I just moved to Santa Rosa, thought I was finally going to do it.
" No Fusion ;-(

What about fiber? I thought Sonic offered fiber in Santa Rosa.
Keith Keller
2014-11-25 16:11:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rob Warnock
One static IP is a free option with Fusion, but it's a bit
tricky to run a mail [or any other] server
It's tricky to run *any* mail server.
Post by Rob Warnock
if you also want
to use the default [read: required] modem/router/WiFi that
comes with Fusion. However, for an extra $10/month, they'll
allocate four static IPs for you, and then things get a *lot*
simpler to configure [see the "LAN Subports" feature].
Can yoo configure their ADSL modem as a modem, and do the NAT
routing with your own equipment? That's how my modem is configured,
though I'm not using their new maintenance-plan modems (it is one I
purchased from Sonic before they went to their $10/month modem lease).
I have one static IP configured, and I can run all my services without
problems behind my own DD-WRT-based router.

--keith
--
kkeller-***@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
(try just my userid to email me)
AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
see X- headers for PGP signature information
Kevin McMurtrie
2014-11-26 04:40:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Keith Keller
Post by Rob Warnock
One static IP is a free option with Fusion, but it's a bit
tricky to run a mail [or any other] server
It's tricky to run *any* mail server.
Post by Rob Warnock
if you also want
to use the default [read: required] modem/router/WiFi that
comes with Fusion. However, for an extra $10/month, they'll
allocate four static IPs for you, and then things get a *lot*
simpler to configure [see the "LAN Subports" feature].
Can yoo configure their ADSL modem as a modem, and do the NAT
routing with your own equipment? That's how my modem is configured,
though I'm not using their new maintenance-plan modems (it is one I
purchased from Sonic before they went to their $10/month modem lease).
I have one static IP configured, and I can run all my services without
problems behind my own DD-WRT-based router.
--keith
With the older "bring your own modem" plans you simply put the modem
into bridged mode. I've heard it can be done with the newer rental
modems too, though it accidentally gets put into NAT mode if they
service it.

Sonic.net feels a lot like an ISP from 15 years ago - lots of features
but very slow and lacking modern tech. Their web hosting server is on
antique Apache server with a 2GB file limit, IPv6 still doesn't quite
work, and they're having trouble getting off AT&T's rotting wires. I
keep hearing that big things are coming but they're already so far
behind.
--
I will not see posts from astraweb, theremailer, dizum, or google
because they host Usenet flooders.
Keith Keller
2014-11-26 05:16:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
Sonic.net feels a lot like an ISP from 15 years ago - lots of features
but very slow and lacking modern tech. Their web hosting server is on
antique Apache server with a 2GB file limit,
Do you really have files larger than 2GB you want HTTP clients
downloading? (Not saying it's old, if true, but it's hard to see
supporting large file sizes as a priority.)
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
IPv6 still doesn't quite work,
Does it work under AT&T or Comcast? (I'm not needling, I honestly don't
know.)
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
and they're having trouble getting off AT&T's rotting wires.
The difficulty here is that AT&T and Comcast are actively dominating the
fiber installation market, where governments have been reluctant to
introduce legislation requiring them to share with ILECs like they have
to share copper. AT&T knows this, which is a big reason they're into
fiber in the first place: no competition, so they can suck at customer
service without consequence. Sonic is putting in fiber in some areas,
but they're not big enough to get into lots of neighborhoods before AT&T
and Comcast. The eventual outcome could be that many of these otherwise
good ISPs fold, and we're stuck with AT&T or some other local large
monopoly.

--keith
--
kkeller-***@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
(try just my userid to email me)
AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
see X- headers for PGP signature information
Kevin McMurtrie
2014-11-27 02:55:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Keith Keller
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
Sonic.net feels a lot like an ISP from 15 years ago - lots of features
but very slow and lacking modern tech. Their web hosting server is on
antique Apache server with a 2GB file limit,
Do you really have files larger than 2GB you want HTTP clients
downloading? (Not saying it's old, if true, but it's hard to see
supporting large file sizes as a priority.)
I want to send digitized VCR tapes to family. I can host it on my own
server but my connection is too slow for streaming.
Post by Keith Keller
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
IPv6 still doesn't quite work,
Does it work under AT&T or Comcast? (I'm not needling, I honestly don't
know.)
I've heard that Comcast and T-Mobile have native IPv6. Sonic.net has
6rd tunnels available for users of a specific type of rented single-line
ADSL modem, but there's quite a performance hit from the low MTU it
provides. It doesn't work on bonded ADSL and it's not supported for
purchased modems.
Post by Keith Keller
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
and they're having trouble getting off AT&T's rotting wires.
The difficulty here is that AT&T and Comcast are actively dominating the
fiber installation market, where governments have been reluctant to
introduce legislation requiring them to share with ILECs like they have
to share copper. AT&T knows this, which is a big reason they're into
fiber in the first place: no competition, so they can suck at customer
service without consequence. Sonic is putting in fiber in some areas,
but they're not big enough to get into lots of neighborhoods before AT&T
and Comcast. The eventual outcome could be that many of these otherwise
good ISPs fold, and we're stuck with AT&T or some other local large
monopoly.
--keith
Remember when they were going to rule the world with fiber? Remember
when they were partnering with Google? Remember when they were testing
rapid fiber deployment systems. Years have passed only two
neighborhoods have it.
--
I will not see posts from astraweb, theremailer, dizum, or google
because they host Usenet flooders.
Steve Pope
2014-11-27 02:59:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
I've heard that Comcast and T-Mobile have native IPv6.
When I was using T-Mobile's roaming in Europe, I set my phone's APN to
use IPv6 but when I returned to the US, I had to set it back to IPv4.
Otherwise, no transport. (My particular phone does not allow both
simultaneously.)

So based on that datapoint, I am not sure T-Mobile USA has native
IPv6.

Steve
Keith Keller
2014-11-27 03:11:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
Post by Keith Keller
Do you really have files larger than 2GB you want HTTP clients
downloading? (Not saying it's old, if true, but it's hard to see
supporting large file sizes as a priority.)
I want to send digitized VCR tapes to family. I can host it on my own
server but my connection is too slow for streaming.
I think I'd still prefer to either split the files so each individual
file isn't so large, or send them a USB stick.
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
I've heard that Comcast and T-Mobile have native IPv6.
Maybe, but do they actually work?
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
Remember when they were going to rule the world with fiber? Remember
when they were partnering with Google? Remember when they were testing
rapid fiber deployment systems. Years have passed only two
neighborhoods have it.
Well, I remember when they said they'd rule the world with fiber, and
discounted that as wishful thinking and/or marketing bulshytt. :)

--keith
--
kkeller-***@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
(try just my userid to email me)
AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
see X- headers for PGP signature information
Mike Stump
2014-11-30 05:00:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Keith Keller
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
I've heard that Comcast and T-Mobile have native IPv6.
Maybe, but do they actually work?
Comcast, yes.

The usual problems would be, you need to update your cable modem, if
old. You need to update your NAT device to support it, if it doesn't
already.
David Kaye
2014-11-27 12:58:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
I want to send digitized VCR tapes to family. I can host it on my own
server but my connection is too slow for streaming.
Can't you just set up a cheap no-frills website on 1and1 or some other web
hosting company and have your family http or ftp the files? It's the
easiest solution. I'll vouch for the fact that 1and1 is great, and unlike
most other web hosts they don't demand automatic renewals.




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Mike Stump
2014-11-30 04:58:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
IPv6 still doesn't quite work,
Does it work under Comcast?
Yes.
d***@99.usenet.us.com
2014-12-02 06:08:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Keith Keller
Post by Kevin McMurtrie
IPv6 still doesn't quite work,
Does it work under AT&T or Comcast?
(I'm not needling, I honestly don't know.)
I was surprised to see that many of my outbound Comcast connections are IPv6.
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
David Kaye
2014-12-02 22:19:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@99.usenet.us.com
I was surprised to see that many of my outbound Comcast connections are IPv6.
I wish that the committee that came up with IPv6 had done it differently. I
can't remember them and it's too hard to tell things like subnets and stuff.




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Bhairitu
2014-12-03 19:16:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kaye
Post by d***@99.usenet.us.com
I was surprised to see that many of my outbound Comcast connections are IPv6.
I wish that the committee that came up with IPv6 had done it differently. I
can't remember them and it's too hard to tell things like subnets and stuff.
I seem to recall the original idea was 6 numbers but then they came up
with the version you mention.
Keith Keller
2014-12-03 20:36:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bhairitu
Post by David Kaye
I wish that the committee that came up with IPv6 had done it differently. I
can't remember them and it's too hard to tell things like subnets and stuff.
I seem to recall the original idea was 6 numbers but then they came up
with the version you mention.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6#Address_representation

Not really all that hard, is it?

--keith
--
kkeller-***@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
(try just my userid to email me)
AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
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Mike Stump
2014-12-04 20:09:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kaye
Post by d***@99.usenet.us.com
I was surprised to see that many of my outbound Comcast connections are IPv6.
I wish that the committee that came up with IPv6 had done it differently. I
can't remember them and it's too hard to tell things like subnets and stuff.
Unfortunately, the software is still rolling out and will for the next
20 years. Maybe in 50, when most people only have v6, will all the
old software be replaced with working new software. Hope you can
wait.

But, in Comcast's defense, the original v6 spec didn't manage things
like DHCP, they told the world, we don't need no DHCP, but, they were
wrong. You can ask Comcast for addresses and not pay $1 a month per
address, thankfully. You do that with DHCPv6. Your router/host
softare is then free to pass this address out to all the subnets you
want. I wish they were passing out /48s, but they're not, just /60
last I checked. Anyway, this gives you 16 subnets to play with.

I've done that, pretty seemless once all _your_ software updates.
Rob Warnock
2014-11-26 07:11:38 UTC
Permalink
Keith Keller <kkeller-***@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us> wrote:
+---------------
| Rob Warnock <***@rpw3.org> wrote:
| > One static IP is a free option with Fusion, but it's a bit
| > tricky to run a mail [or any other] server
|
| It's tricky to run *any* mail server.
+---------------

Well, yes. ;-} But Postfix makes it a lot easier than, say,
Sendmail (IMHO), especially the "smtpd_recipient_restrictions"
section. Get that right and your incominh spam falls *way* off...

+---------------
| > if you also want
| > to use the default [read: required] modem/router/WiFi that
| > comes with Fusion. However, for an extra $10/month, they'll
| > allocate four static IPs for you, and then things get a *lot*
| > simpler to configure [see the "LAN Subports" feature].
|
| Can yoo configure their ADSL modem as a modem, and do the NAT
| routing with your own equipment? That's how my modem is configured,
| though I'm not using their new maintenance-plan modems (it is one I
| purchased from Sonic before they went to their $10/month modem lease).
| I have one static IP configured, and I can run all my services without
| problems behind my own DD-WRT-based router.
+---------------

I think you can do something like that with their new PACE 4111N
modem, too, even without going into "bridge mode" [which works,
but is not supported by Sonic and so may revert without notice
if they have to access your modem remotely], by running the modem
with a static IP address then manually allocating static addresses
to your servers on the non-published internal (LAN) net, and then
hard-coding mappings for the well-known ports from the external address
to your internal server address(es). [Think "permanent reverse NAT".]

I think. I've never tried it myself[1], though I saw mention of it
on Sonic's user forum <https://forums.sonic.net/>. [I also saw
some mention of a "DMZ server" mode.]


-Rob

[1] Since I have 4 static IPs, and for that "LAN Subports" works fine.

-----
Rob Warnock <***@rpw3.org>
627 26th Avenue <http://rpw3.org/>
San Mateo, CA 94403
b***@MIX.COM
2014-11-27 05:35:55 UTC
Permalink
However, for an extra $10/month, they'll allocate four
static IPs for you, and then things get a *lot* simpler
to configure [see the "LAN Subports" feature].
When did being an ISP start to mean you overcharge
for extremely small IP address blocks?

Billy Y..
--
sub #'9+1 ,r0 ; convert ascii byte
add #9.+1 ,r0 ; to an integer
bcc 20$ ; not a number
Rob Warnock
2014-11-27 11:54:04 UTC
Permalink
<***@MIX.COM> wrote:
+---------------
| Rob Warnock <***@rpw3.org> writes:
| > However, for an extra $10/month, they'll allocate four
| > static IPs for you, and then things get a *lot* simpler
| > to configure [see the "LAN Subports" feature].
|
| When did being an ISP start to mean you overcharge
| for extremely small IP address blocks?
+---------------

I don't know how large Sonic's total IPv4 address allocation is
or how many of their customers request 4 or 8 (or larger) IP blocks,
so I can't comment on whether or not it's really "overcharging".

What I *do* know is that for ~$66/month (incl. all taxes & fees)
for Sonic's "Fusion" I get POTS phone service, with local & domestic
long distance included (plus 8 hrs/month of selected international
calling), call forwarding + call waiting + voicemail, all the
bandwidth ADSL2+ can provide on my line, 4 static IPs, and no
port blocking at all. Whereas with my previous providers, the
monthly total for almost the same service was ~$215!! So I don't
really care if one of the components of the package I have now
is priced a little bit higher or lower, considered in isolation.
What I care about is getting *better* service from nicer folks
for less than one third the total price.

As always in such things, YMMV.


-Rob

-----
Rob Warnock <***@rpw3.org>
627 26th Avenue <http://rpw3.org/>
San Mateo, CA 94403
Steve Pope
2014-11-27 18:45:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rob Warnock
What I *do* know is that for ~$66/month (incl. all taxes & fees)
for Sonic's "Fusion" I get POTS phone service, with local & domestic
long distance included (plus 8 hrs/month of selected international
calling), call forwarding + call waiting + voicemail, all the
bandwidth ADSL2+ can provide on my line, 4 static IPs, and no
port blocking at all. Whereas with my previous providers, the
monthly total for almost the same service was ~$215!!
I believe Sonic is not presently offering 4 static IP's (or
any static IP's) with Fusion. Perhaps you are legacied in.


Steve
Keith Keller
2014-11-27 19:03:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Pope
I believe Sonic is not presently offering 4 static IP's (or
any static IP's) with Fusion. Perhaps you are legacied in.
It is an active offer.

https://signup.sonic.com/shop

(click Broadband)

I still wish they'd make their modem rental fee more obvious. It's only
on that page's FAQ link. (At least it's not in a footnote somewhere.)

--keith
--
kkeller-***@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
(try just my userid to email me)
AOLSFAQ=http://www.therockgarden.ca/aolsfaq.txt
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Steve Pope
2014-11-27 21:57:48 UTC
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Post by Keith Keller
Post by Steve Pope
I believe Sonic is not presently offering 4 static IP's (or
any static IP's) with Fusion. Perhaps you are legacied in.
It is an active offer.
https://signup.sonic.com/shop
(click Broadband)
Cool
Post by Keith Keller
I still wish they'd make their modem rental fee more obvious. It's only
on that page's FAQ link.
Yeah, but it makes sense... why should they be in the business
of providing modems, replacing them when they break, etc.

Steve
Keith Keller
2014-11-28 05:26:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Pope
Post by Keith Keller
I still wish they'd make their modem rental fee more obvious. It's only
on that page's FAQ link.
Yeah, but it makes sense... why should they be in the business
of providing modems, replacing them when they break, etc.
I'm not complaining about the policy. I'm complaining about them not
making the policy more prominent in their marketing.

--keith
--
kkeller-***@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
(try just my userid to email me)
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