Discussion:
A Really Good Router
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David Kaye
2014-06-17 05:23:21 UTC
Permalink
Okay, I had an installation requiring a bunch of routers that could be used
as wireless access points. After lots of deliberation both on price and
stats, I chose an interesting and cheap product. TP Link's Tl-WR841HP,
called a "High Power" router. It states "Boost Wireless Range", and a 300
Mbps N router, "wall-penetrating wi-fi", etc. Besides turning off DHCP and
turning it into an access point it can also be used as a range extender,
though having only one transmitter/receiver, it can only communicate at half
speed in this configuration.

I chose this router because it was small, lightweight, has screw holes on
the bottom for wall mounting, and I didn't think it would get warm.

Bingo on all accounts. But not only that, this router really DOES seem to
have extended range. I needed to replace the existing WAP with a router so
that I could connect two more WAPs to it, thus giving 3 wireless signals. I
did a before/after with NetStumbler and saved the graphs. A WORLD of
difference. Whereas the previous WAP could only produce a usable noise-free
signal about 50 feet (lots of metal construction in the building), the TP
Link signals from each WAP were reliable at 150-200 feet and across 3
floors! Amazing.

I'm not sure how they manage to do this if the signal limit is supposed to
be .1 watt. But whatever the case I'm very happy I bought this model and
intend to buy more in the future.




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Steve Pope
2014-06-17 07:24:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kaye
Okay, I had an installation requiring a bunch of routers that could be used
as wireless access points. After lots of deliberation both on price and
stats, I chose an interesting and cheap product. TP Link's Tl-WR841HP,
called a "High Power" router. It states "Boost Wireless Range", and a 300
Mbps N router, "wall-penetrating wi-fi", etc. Besides turning off DHCP and
turning it into an access point it can also be used as a range extender,
though having only one transmitter/receiver, it can only communicate at half
speed in this configuration.
I chose this router because it was small, lightweight, has screw holes on
the bottom for wall mounting, and I didn't think it would get warm.
Bingo on all accounts. But not only that, this router really DOES seem to
have extended range. I needed to replace the existing WAP with a router so
that I could connect two more WAPs to it, thus giving 3 wireless signals. I
did a before/after with NetStumbler and saved the graphs. A WORLD of
difference. Whereas the previous WAP could only produce a usable noise-free
signal about 50 feet (lots of metal construction in the building), the TP
Link signals from each WAP were reliable at 150-200 feet and across 3
floors! Amazing.
I'm not sure how they manage to do this if the signal limit is supposed to
be .1 watt. But whatever the case I'm very happy I bought this model and
intend to buy more in the future.
Without looking up the specs, I can tell you that in the 2.4 band,
you are permitted 1W of conducted output and 6 dB antenna gain beyond
that. In the 5 GHz band, there are conditions that allow either
200, 400 or 800 milliwatts of conducted power output.

However, due to guard bands and forbidden zones, you can only
use these higher levels of allowed power in certain channels,
and then you may need expensive power amplifiers and filters in the radios.

The 100 mW number is more of a rule-of-thumb, rather than a
hard regulatory limit.


Steve

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