Discussion:
Hotel Insulation
(too old to reply)
David Kaye
2014-06-26 02:36:24 UTC
Permalink
The residential hotel I've been working on here and there, well, the
high-speed wi-fi is working fine and people are ecstatic about it. Some
people. Others can't connect. There are currently 8 wi-fi access points
and a couple extenders (which weren't my doing).

One especially vociferous resident complained that he can hit an extender at
low speed (of course) but not the wi-fi hotspot 20 feet from his door. I
was incredulous. With so many WAPs surely he must be able to hit something.
He has a MacBook. Hmmm...grumble grumble...

I brought in my PC with my trusty NetStumbler on it (which looks at each
hotspot it can see and repeatedly checks signal strength, graphs it out, and
saves the whole mess for later viewing. Well, NetStumbler showed me that at
the guy's desk in his apartment, the slow extender can be seen and the WAP
20 feet away can be seen, but I couldn't connect to it reliably. Odd.

At his desk the signal is fairly low and a bit spotty (the graph isn't
steady but dips a bit from time to time). PC in hand, I walk through the
apartment and out the door to the hallway. There are two thresholds between
his desk and the hallway, which may have been part of some previous
configuration of the apartment.

As I cross the last threshold the signal BOOMS in.

Well, a little thought here. The hotel was built in 1915, after the 1906 SF
earthquake and fire. I guess the place was built to last. A handyman they
have told me that sometimes he drills to hang something like a fire
extinguisher or other necessary item and he hits steel just the other side
of the plaster/lathe wall. Then I was told by a resident who's somewhat of
an expert in downtown buildings that, not only is the building likely made
with steel beams, but also concrete and the walls were likely covered with
aluminum wainscoting before the many times it was painted over.

So, it looks likely that the place is SO well built that highband UHF can't
even penetrate it!

My solution looks like it'll be this: put WAPs on the floors above and below
the trouble spots, since the resident (several, actually) CAN hit the
extender on the floor above. So, it looks to me like while the walls are
super-sturdy, the floors and ceilings are probably conventional wood and
plaster.

Amazing.




---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
Kevin McMurtrie
2014-06-26 04:39:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kaye
The residential hotel I've been working on here and there, well, the
high-speed wi-fi is working fine and people are ecstatic about it. Some
people. Others can't connect. There are currently 8 wi-fi access points
and a couple extenders (which weren't my doing).
One especially vociferous resident complained that he can hit an extender at
low speed (of course) but not the wi-fi hotspot 20 feet from his door. I
was incredulous. With so many WAPs surely he must be able to hit something.
He has a MacBook. Hmmm...grumble grumble...
I brought in my PC with my trusty NetStumbler on it (which looks at each
hotspot it can see and repeatedly checks signal strength, graphs it out, and
saves the whole mess for later viewing. Well, NetStumbler showed me that at
the guy's desk in his apartment, the slow extender can be seen and the WAP
20 feet away can be seen, but I couldn't connect to it reliably. Odd.
At his desk the signal is fairly low and a bit spotty (the graph isn't
steady but dips a bit from time to time). PC in hand, I walk through the
apartment and out the door to the hallway. There are two thresholds between
his desk and the hallway, which may have been part of some previous
configuration of the apartment.
As I cross the last threshold the signal BOOMS in.
Well, a little thought here. The hotel was built in 1915, after the 1906 SF
earthquake and fire. I guess the place was built to last. A handyman they
have told me that sometimes he drills to hang something like a fire
extinguisher or other necessary item and he hits steel just the other side
of the plaster/lathe wall. Then I was told by a resident who's somewhat of
an expert in downtown buildings that, not only is the building likely made
with steel beams, but also concrete and the walls were likely covered with
aluminum wainscoting before the many times it was painted over.
So, it looks likely that the place is SO well built that highband UHF can't
even penetrate it!
My solution looks like it'll be this: put WAPs on the floors above and below
the trouble spots, since the resident (several, actually) CAN hit the
extender on the floor above. So, it looks to me like while the walls are
super-sturdy, the floors and ceilings are probably conventional wood and
plaster.
Amazing.
Most of the hotels that I've been to recently put a WAP in each room.
They're connected by whatever means possible - DSL or cable on existing
wires or new runs of Ethernet. The LAN plug of that hooks up to the
hotel's TV control module.


Stucco held up by thick steel mesh and heavy sound insulation panels
(looks like sheetrock made of concrete) don't let RF through. Most
exterior doors have a metal shell for longevity and toughness.
David Kaye
2014-06-27 21:35:39 UTC
Permalink
Well, he then has a computer that comes with a WiFi
diagnostic utility built in. You could have used that.
My results with NetStumbler were the same as his, but NetStumbler includes
the ability to graph ALL available wi-fi connections over a period of time
(minutes, hours) and save them for later viewing. I now have a record of
all signals that were present that day.




---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
Julian Macassey
2014-06-28 13:54:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kaye
Well, he then has a computer that comes with a WiFi
diagnostic utility built in. You could have used that.
My results with NetStumbler were the same as his, but NetStumbler includes
the ability to graph ALL available wi-fi connections over a period of time
(minutes, hours) and save them for later viewing. I now have a record of
all signals that were present that day.
Yes, the Apple App does all of that, it also prints out
the signal and noise. It comes with the distro.

Apple comes with some excellent utilities and covers
networking pretty well.
--
Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem,
first make sure that you are not, in fact, just surrounded by
arseholes - William Gibson
Julian Macassey
2014-06-27 18:05:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kaye
The residential hotel I've been working on here and there, well, the
high-speed wi-fi is working fine and people are ecstatic about it. Some
people. Others can't connect. There are currently 8 wi-fi access points
and a couple extenders (which weren't my doing).
One especially vociferous resident complained that he can hit an extender at
low speed (of course) but not the wi-fi hotspot 20 feet from his door. I
was incredulous. With so many WAPs surely he must be able to hit something.
He has a MacBook. Hmmm...grumble grumble...
Well, he then has a computer that comes with a WiFi
diagnostic utility built in. You could have used that.


http://osxdaily.com/2011/12/28/check-wireless-signal-strength-optimize-wifi-networks-mac-os-x/
--
Banks are an almost irresistible attraction for that element of
our society which seeks unearned money. - J. Edgar Hoover
b***@MIX.COM
2014-07-01 18:53:03 UTC
Permalink
Well, he then has a computer that comes with a WiFi
diagnostic utility built in. You could have used that.
http://osxdaily.com/2011/12/28/check-wireless-signal-strength-optimize-wifi-networks-mac-os-x/
One can just hold down the Option key, click on the Wi-Fi menu bar icon,
and then choose "Open Wireless Diagnostics..." from the pull-down menu.

| Why Apple changed the process [of invoking the utilities] between
| 10.7 and 10.8 is a mystery, but the feature remains in the newest
| versions of Mac OS X regardless.

And then, with 10.9, it's done with Command-2. Speaking of mysteries.
Heh.

Billy Y..
--
sub #'9+1 ,r0 ; convert ascii byte
add #9.+1 ,r0 ; to an integer
bcc 20$ ; not a number
David Kaye
2014-07-03 06:49:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@MIX.COM
One can just hold down the Option key, click on the Wi-Fi menu bar icon,
and then choose "Open Wireless Diagnostics..." from the pull-down menu.
I read the web page. NetStumbler is still better. It captures every WAP in
range and the results can be saved to a file. I can open the file later and
compare WAPs at any point in time during the capture. It also groups WAPs by
SSID, so you can easily compare different "xfinity" WAPs by MAC address.



---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com

Loading...