Discussion:
VOIP and FWT Home Phone Service to Replace Landline from Sonic
(too old to reply)
sms
2015-04-04 09:21:57 UTC
Permalink
Since I moved to Comcast from Sonic (sadly, but the Sonic DSL speed
limitations in my area became too painful), I am loosing my Fusion home
phone service.

I am not going to pay Comcast $20-30 per month for VOIP.

For now, I am porting my number to Ring.To since the port is free, and
will try Ring.To with an Obihai Obi 202 VOIP adapter. It's $1 per month
for 911 service, but there are no other costs. Google Voice now works
with the Obihai devices so I may put the Google Voice number on their as
well.

Has anyone else here done do-it-yourself VOIP rather than using Ooma,
Magicjack, etc.?

There is also the option of a fixed wireless terminal that uses a
cellular carrier, but those have a higher monthly cost, $10-20 per month
for unlimited service.
sms
2015-04-04 14:23:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Since I moved to Comcast from Sonic (sadly, but the Sonic DSL speed
limitations in my area became too painful), I am loosing my Fusion home
phone service.
Losing, not loosing. How did I do that, that's a pet peeve!
d***@02.usenet.us.com
2015-04-04 19:14:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
I am not going to pay Comcast $20-30 per month for VOIP.
I had the same issue with my cable internet provider. First year was $9,
second was $19, third was [going to be] $49.

Nope. Went to "basictalk.com" which was the Walmart-marketed Vonage.
The marketing is confused, now. If you go to Vonage, you can find $9.99
for a short time, then more. If you go to Walmart, you buy the adapter,
but it's $9.99 forever. If you go to basictalk.com it's $9.99 and a free
adapter.

At Walmart, the "Vonage" adapter looks like mine, but the "Basictalk"
adapter looks different, equal to the one at the basictalk site.

I have "Vonage Extensions" on my cell phone, so my home phone rings on my
cellphone, and I can make calls using my home phone number as CID.

When I moved, and got Comcast, I didn't even consider their telephone
service. I just brought my Vonage adapter with me. Another plus is that I
avoided the absolutely awful Arris modem/router/voice piece of junk, and
bought a Motorola modem.

It did cost $25 to port my number, as I recall, but that is free, now.

Did I convince you? We could both get a $10 gift card ;-)
http://refer.basictalk.com/micro/microsite?source=home_floater
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
Roy
2015-04-04 19:44:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@02.usenet.us.com
Post by sms
I am not going to pay Comcast $20-30 per month for VOIP.
I had the same issue with my cable internet provider. First year was $9,
second was $19, third was [going to be] $49.
Nope. Went to "basictalk.com" which was the Walmart-marketed Vonage.
The marketing is confused, now. If you go to Vonage, you can find $9.99
for a short time, then more. If you go to Walmart, you buy the adapter,
but it's $9.99 forever. If you go to basictalk.com it's $9.99 and a free
adapter.
At Walmart, the "Vonage" adapter looks like mine, but the "Basictalk"
adapter looks different, equal to the one at the basictalk site.
I have "Vonage Extensions" on my cell phone, so my home phone rings on my
cellphone, and I can make calls using my home phone number as CID.
When I moved, and got Comcast, I didn't even consider their telephone
service. I just brought my Vonage adapter with me. Another plus is that I
avoided the absolutely awful Arris modem/router/voice piece of junk, and
bought a Motorola modem.
It did cost $25 to port my number, as I recall, but that is free, now.
Did I convince you? We could both get a $10 gift card ;-)
http://refer.basictalk.com/micro/microsite?source=home_floater
OOMA is $4.06/month here and that is all fees to the government
sms
2015-04-04 21:29:40 UTC
Permalink
On 4/4/2015 12:44 PM, Roy wrote:

<snip>
Post by Roy
OOMA is $4.06/month here and that is all fees to the government
I narrowed it down to an Ooma device with Ooma service or an Obihai
device with Ring.To or Google Voice service. I could not see any
advantage to Ooma other than the initial setup is a tad easier because
you're dealing with only one company.

I also saw a post from someone who had tried both systems and found the
Obihai had better quality of service. This is important to me because
I'll never hear the end of it from SWMBO if the call quality is lousy.

There's a comparison chart here:
<http://blog.tmcnet.com/blog/tom-keating/voip/magicjack-vs-nettalk-vs-ooma.asp>.
Basic Talk is not there since the comparison is a bit old. But
basically, the service partners to Obihai offer service similar to Ooma
Premier but at only $1 per month.

One thing with these VOIP devices is that it's better to get one with a
one port router built in and then put the VOIP device between your modem
and your wireless/wired router. This helps your quality of service
because voice packets are prioritized (this isn't great if you have Gb/s
service because it's only a 100Mb/s router). Basic Talk and Magic Jack
don't have the router built in, Vonage, Obihai, and Ooma do. Obviously
you need a separate DSL or cable modem and wireless router to be able to
do this.

It's a bit more work to set up an Obihai device. You're dealing with
three companies, one for the hardware (Obihai), one for the voice
service (Ring.To or Google), and one for 911 service (Anveo). But Obihai
has made the procedure pretty straightforward and you do it all through
their portal. Anveo also sells voice service, and it's the most fully
featured, even including FAX capability, but it's a whopping $7 per
month plus taxes and fees.
Roy
2015-04-05 00:19:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
...
<http://blog.tmcnet.com/blog/tom-keating/voip/magicjack-vs-nettalk-vs-ooma.asp>.
Basic Talk is not there since the comparison is a bit old. But
basically, the service partners to Obihai offer service similar to Ooma
Premier but at only $1 per month.
The review is from 2012. BasicTalk is Vonage under the covers.
Post by sms
One thing with these VOIP devices is that it's better to get one with a
one port router built in and then put the VOIP device between your modem
and your wireless/wired router. This helps your quality of service
because voice packets are prioritized (this isn't great if you have Gb/s
service because it's only a 100Mb/s router). Basic Talk and Magic Jack
don't have the router built in, Vonage, Obihai, and Ooma do. Obviously
you need a separate DSL or cable modem and wireless router to be able to
do this.
I wouldn't do this. I significantly increased the Internet speed at one
customer by moving the VOIP box to the LAN side of the router. These
boxes are not known for having a lot of processor power and IP routing
takes processor.
Post by sms
It's a bit more work to set up an Obihai device. You're dealing with
three companies, one for the hardware (Obihai), one for the voice
service (Ring.To or Google), and one for 911 service (Anveo). But Obihai
has made the procedure pretty straightforward and you do it all through
their portal. Anveo also sells voice service, and it's the most fully
featured, even including FAX capability, but it's a whopping $7 per
month plus taxes and fees.
sms
2015-04-06 21:58:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roy
Post by sms
...
<http://blog.tmcnet.com/blog/tom-keating/voip/magicjack-vs-nettalk-vs-ooma.asp>.
Basic Talk is not there since the comparison is a bit old. But
basically, the service partners to Obihai offer service similar to Ooma
Premier but at only $1 per month.
The review is from 2012. BasicTalk is Vonage under the covers.
Post by sms
One thing with these VOIP devices is that it's better to get one with a
one port router built in and then put the VOIP device between your modem
and your wireless/wired router. This helps your quality of service
because voice packets are prioritized (this isn't great if you have Gb/s
service because it's only a 100Mb/s router). Basic Talk and Magic Jack
don't have the router built in, Vonage, Obihai, and Ooma do. Obviously
you need a separate DSL or cable modem and wireless router to be able to
do this.
I wouldn't do this. I significantly increased the Internet speed at one
customer by moving the VOIP box to the LAN side of the router. These
boxes are not known for having a lot of processor power and IP routing
takes processor.
I'll check if the speed changed tonight. The audio quality on the Obihai
device is excellent and there are no delays with the latency from Comcast.
sms
2015-04-07 06:09:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Post by Roy
Post by sms
...
<http://blog.tmcnet.com/blog/tom-keating/voip/magicjack-vs-nettalk-vs-ooma.asp>.
Basic Talk is not there since the comparison is a bit old. But
basically, the service partners to Obihai offer service similar to Ooma
Premier but at only $1 per month.
The review is from 2012. BasicTalk is Vonage under the covers.
Post by sms
One thing with these VOIP devices is that it's better to get one with a
one port router built in and then put the VOIP device between your modem
and your wireless/wired router. This helps your quality of service
because voice packets are prioritized (this isn't great if you have Gb/s
service because it's only a 100Mb/s router). Basic Talk and Magic Jack
don't have the router built in, Vonage, Obihai, and Ooma do. Obviously
you need a separate DSL or cable modem and wireless router to be able to
do this.
I wouldn't do this. I significantly increased the Internet speed at one
customer by moving the VOIP box to the LAN side of the router. These
boxes are not known for having a lot of processor power and IP routing
takes processor.
I'll check if the speed changed tonight. The audio quality on the Obihai
device is excellent and there are no delays with the latency from Comcast.
Yes, the "100 Mb/s router" in the Obi 202 slowed down the throughput
significantly, fro 59 Mb/s to about 25 Mb/s. So for now, I'll try the
Obi device plugged into a router port and not between the router and the
modem. All three devices are plugged into a UPS of course.
d***@02.usenet.us.com
2015-04-07 01:17:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
One thing with these VOIP devices is that it's better to get one with a
one port router built in and then put the VOIP device between your modem
and your wireless/wired router. This helps your quality of service
because voice packets are prioritized (this isn't great if you have Gb/s
service because it's only a 100Mb/s router). Basic Talk and Magic Jack
don't have the router built in, Vonage, Obihai, and Ooma do. Obviously
you need a separate DSL or cable modem and wireless router to be able to
do this.
Vonage has a WAN and LAN port, although I would call it a firewall and not
a router. It is only 100 MBpS, which probably isn't sufficient for the
data speed of my Cable Internet. For a while, when I was on a slower
service, I used that feedthrough, with a DMZ to my "real" router behind it.

Folks on the Comcast forums are whining about which router can actually
deliver full speed even with a GigE interface, since the processing load is
pretty high.

I don't think prioritizing a 128Kbit voice stream is important on my link.
Post by sms
It's a bit more work to set up an Obihai device. You're dealing with
three companies,
One of the reasons I have Vonage. Plug it in, plug in my phone, done.
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
d***@02.usenet.us.com
2015-04-07 01:33:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@02.usenet.us.com
Vonage has a WAN and LAN port, although I would call it a firewall and not
I should have said "my Vonage box". The userguide for the BasicTalk
HT701F adapter shows no "LAN" connection.
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
d***@02.usenet.us.com
2015-04-07 01:09:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roy
OOMA is $4.06/month here and that is all fees to the government
I worry about the business model of "free".
I've already followed a couple of VoIP providers into the ground.
Vonage has been around for a while.
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
Travis James
2015-04-07 03:14:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@02.usenet.us.com
Post by Roy
OOMA is $4.06/month here and that is all fees to the government
I worry about the business model of "free".
I've already followed a couple of VoIP providers into the ground.
Vonage has been around for a while.
Their business model isn't free. It's just an option. I have had Ooma
for about 7 years. I do pay for it: $120 a year for 2 lines,
blacklisting, iOS VOIP app and some other junk I don't use.

I'm still using the original hardware that they don't even sell any longer.
sms
2015-04-07 06:19:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@02.usenet.us.com
Post by Roy
OOMA is $4.06/month here and that is all fees to the government
I worry about the business model of "free".
I've already followed a couple of VoIP providers into the ground.
Vonage has been around for a while.
Vonage was on the verge of bankruptcy six years ago but they found an
investor and staved that off. But they're facing a lot of competition
from $7-10 a month competitors like Ooma and Basic Talk, as well as the
cellular based home phone services.

A lot of people will dump their home phone service if they have to pay
$25+ per month as with AT&T or Vonage, but would keep service for $10 or
less per month.
sms
2015-04-04 19:50:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@02.usenet.us.com
Post by sms
I am not going to pay Comcast $20-30 per month for VOIP.
I had the same issue with my cable internet provider. First year was $9,
second was $19, third was [going to be] $49.
Nope. Went to "basictalk.com" which was the Walmart-marketed Vonage.
The marketing is confused, now. If you go to Vonage, you can find $9.99
for a short time, then more. If you go to Walmart, you buy the adapter,
but it's $9.99 forever. If you go to basictalk.com it's $9.99 and a free
adapter.
At Walmart, the "Vonage" adapter looks like mine, but the "Basictalk"
adapter looks different, equal to the one at the basictalk site.
I have "Vonage Extensions" on my cell phone, so my home phone rings on my
cellphone, and I can make calls using my home phone number as CID.
When I moved, and got Comcast, I didn't even consider their telephone
service. I just brought my Vonage adapter with me. Another plus is that I
avoided the absolutely awful Arris modem/router/voice piece of junk, and
bought a Motorola modem.
It did cost $25 to port my number, as I recall, but that is free, now.
Did I convince you? We could both get a $10 gift card ;-)
http://refer.basictalk.com/micro/microsite?source=home_floater
No.

I am going to try out the Obihai Obi 202 with Ring.To. It's $1 per month
because you have to buy E911 service which is $12 per year. The Obi 202
also works with Google Voice which is $0-1 per month (Google Voice
doesn't require E911 service).

Basic Talk is certainly a lot cheaper than Vonage, but $10 per month
(actually about $12-13 after all taxes and fees) is still very high for
VOIP. The Magicjack Go is $35 per year (really $45 since they charge an
extra $10 per year to keep your ported number which is a big ripoff).
d***@02.usenet.us.com
2015-04-07 01:24:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Basic Talk is certainly a lot cheaper than Vonage, but $10 per month
(actually about $12-13 after all taxes and fees) is still very high for
VOIP.
It beats the $49 that Mediacom wanted, and I enjoy paying for things,
instead of wondering how a company can stay in business.
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
sms
2015-04-07 04:53:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@02.usenet.us.com
Post by sms
Basic Talk is certainly a lot cheaper than Vonage, but $10 per month
(actually about $12-13 after all taxes and fees) is still very high for
VOIP.
It beats the $49 that Mediacom wanted, and I enjoy paying for things,
instead of wondering how a company can stay in business.
Pretty sure that Google is going to stay in business for a while. They
haven't promised that basic Google Voice will be free forever, but even
if they decided to charge a small amount for it it would be okay. They
already charge for international calls. Probably a lot more likely that
Google Voice will be around than Basic Talk which has very low market
share in VOIP. But it's immaterial. If one VOIP service fails there are
others to take its place. It's a minor inconvenience to change.

One thing that these VOIP companies (and cellular companies) are good at
doing is comparing their monthly cost with the most expensive
alternatives and proclaim a huge cost savings.
d***@02.usenet.us.com
2015-04-12 04:46:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
share in VOIP. But it's immaterial. If one VOIP service fails there are
others to take its place. It's a minor inconvenience to change.
That's for sure.
But if basictalk folds, I'll just do without.
I don't need a "landline" anymore.
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
David Kaye
2015-04-12 05:10:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@02.usenet.us.com
That's for sure.
But if basictalk folds, I'll just do without.
I don't need a "landline" anymore.
I haven't had a landline in over 10 years, and not only do I conduct my own
business with it, I also book high-end karaoke for a friend. His number
forwards to mine, but gives a voice announcement that the call is being
forwarded from his number, so I know how to answer the call. He conducts
his karaoke business without a landline, either, and has been successful
enough to quit his tech support job and put on karaoke events fulltime.

Landline? Gosh, I'm not even sure what a Western Electric 500 handset feels
like anymore.




---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com
Steve Pope
2015-04-12 16:01:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kaye
Post by d***@02.usenet.us.com
That's for sure.
But if basictalk folds, I'll just do without.
I don't need a "landline" anymore.
I haven't had a landline in over 10 years, and not only do I conduct my own
business with it, I also book high-end karaoke for a friend. His number
forwards to mine, but gives a voice announcement that the call is being
forwarded from his number, so I know how to answer the call. He conducts
his karaoke business without a landline, either, and has been successful
enough to quit his tech support job and put on karaoke events fulltime.
Landline? Gosh, I'm not even sure what a Western Electric 500 handset feels
like anymore.
I've got a two-line Panasonic Easa-Phone on my home office desk.
One line is ATT, the other Sonic, DSL on both. When we bought
the house 30 years ago, I made sure there were two copper pairs
entering the property because even back then they would balk at
adding a second pair.

I'm keeping this friggin' copper in service until they drag me
out in a hearse.


Steve
sms
2015-04-13 03:45:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Pope
Post by David Kaye
Post by d***@02.usenet.us.com
That's for sure.
But if basictalk folds, I'll just do without.
I don't need a "landline" anymore.
I haven't had a landline in over 10 years, and not only do I conduct my own
business with it, I also book high-end karaoke for a friend. His number
forwards to mine, but gives a voice announcement that the call is being
forwarded from his number, so I know how to answer the call. He conducts
his karaoke business without a landline, either, and has been successful
enough to quit his tech support job and put on karaoke events fulltime.
Landline? Gosh, I'm not even sure what a Western Electric 500 handset feels
like anymore.
I've got a two-line Panasonic Easa-Phone on my home office desk.
One line is ATT, the other Sonic, DSL on both. When we bought
the house 30 years ago, I made sure there were two copper pairs
entering the property because even back then they would balk at
adding a second pair.
Long ago, when I got SDSL service, AT&T sent someone out to run a new
line from the pole with two pairs. Until then I had 1.5 pairs. They did
not charge for this AFAIK.
Rob Warnock
2015-04-13 06:06:45 UTC
Permalink
sms <***@geemail.com> wrote:
+---------------
| Steve Pope wrote:
| > David Kaye <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
| >> Landline? Gosh, I'm not even sure what a Western Electric
| >> 500 handset feels like anymore.
+---------------

I've still got two type 2500 desksets and a wallmount (forgot the model)
that I bought from AT&T [or was it PacBell then?] when they did the
inside/outside split. They all still work just fine.

+---------------
| > I've got a two-line Panasonic Easa-Phone on my home office desk.
| > One line is ATT, the other Sonic, DSL on both. When we bought
| > the house 30 years ago, I made sure there were two copper pairs
| > entering the property because even back then they would balk at
| > adding a second pair.
|
| Long ago, when I got SDSL service, AT&T sent someone out to run a new
| line from the pole with two pairs. Until then I had 1.5 pairs. They did
| not charge for this AFAIK.
+---------------

When I moved into my current place some 30 years ago, I also
moved the two POTS numbers from the previous place [the second
of which was my "modem line" -- remember those?]. But of course,
the new place had only a one-pair drop, so they sent out an
installer to add another pair. He asked if I was going to get any
more phones, and I said, "Yes, I'm probably going to get a roommate".
So instead of adding another single pair he ripped out the original
pair and ran a 6-pair back to the pole-mounted cross-connect box,
which was actually on a cross street some 2+ blocks away, and
installed a [now old-fashioned] 6-pair lightning-arrestor demarc.
There was no charge for this.

Doing it that way was not entirely altruistic, since it let him use
the existing drop as a pull wire ;-} and also saved another pull
for the third line [which I did eventually add, then later removed].
Between various roommates & ISDN & SDSL/ADSL connections over the
years, there have been as many as four of the pairs in use at any
one time. But since I switched to Sonic's "Fusion", I'm back down
to only one pair in use. ;-}


-Rob

-----
Rob Warnock <***@rpw3.org>
627 26th Avenue <http://rpw3.org/>
San Mateo, CA 94403
Steve Pope
2015-04-13 21:07:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Long ago, when I got SDSL service, AT&T sent someone out to run a new
line from the pole with two pairs. Until then I had 1.5 pairs. They did
not charge for this AFAIK.
It was not impossible by any means. It really depends on whether
they are running out of pairs on the existing nearby poles.
If you have two pairs, but both are not in service, they
are likely to disconnect your unused pair if somebody on the
block wants a second line.

I pretty much believe the have stopped running new copper
along telephone poles, and the sunset date for existing
copper is likely to be before 2025.

By then I will be age 70. It might not be an issue for me.

Steve

sms
2015-04-12 15:05:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@02.usenet.us.com
Post by sms
share in VOIP. But it's immaterial. If one VOIP service fails there are
others to take its place. It's a minor inconvenience to change.
That's for sure.
But if basictalk folds, I'll just do without.
I don't need a "landline" anymore.
Vonage seems to be out of the woods for now. They were close to
bankruptcy a couple of years ago, but got some investors and made some
changes. But they can only succeed as long as enough of the $25+
customers don't realize that they're paying way too much for service.

BasicTalk is cheap enough that a lot of people won't bother to change to
one of the lower cost services just to save $100 per year or so.
sms
2015-04-12 15:16:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@02.usenet.us.com
Post by sms
share in VOIP. But it's immaterial. If one VOIP service fails there are
others to take its place. It's a minor inconvenience to change.
That's for sure.
But if basictalk folds, I'll just do without.
I don't need a "landline" anymore.
Other than the start-up cost for Ooma, I can't imagine anyone signing up
for Basic Talk rather than Ooma Premier if they want a one-stop
solution. The monthly cost is about the same, $10 plus taxes and fees,
but you get so much more with Ooma Premier.
David Arnstein
2015-04-05 05:21:22 UTC
Permalink
I prefer a VOIP service that offers low monthly membership cost, and
per-minute air time billing. I also prefer very high reliability but I
don't quite get that. Sigh. Anyway, I don't talk much on the phone. If
your family talks a lot, Vonage might be a better choice.

I had Callcentric for about a year and it was great. Then, Callcentric
was the subject of a DDOS attack. Shortly thereafter, Callcentric was
affected by flooding in New York City. I bailed.

I have voip.ms now. It is pretty good. It uses multiple servers,
distributed around the world. You can switch servers at any time. The
flooding business in NYC made this an attractive feature, for me.

Both of these services will work with your Obihai ATA. They both have
e911 service. They both charge by the minute. Monthly fees are not as
good as Ring.To, apparently. Both of these services provide a good call
filtering feature. This is important. I get a lot of unwanted calls. I
don't know if this is because I use VOIP service. Both of these services
require a bit of computer knowhow to use. That should not be an issue
for you.
--
David Arnstein (00)
arnstein+***@pobox.com {{ }}
^^
sms
2015-04-05 17:18:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Arnstein
I prefer a VOIP service that offers low monthly membership cost, and
per-minute air time billing. I also prefer very high reliability but I
don't quite get that. Sigh. Anyway, I don't talk much on the phone. If
your family talks a lot, Vonage might be a better choice.
I had Callcentric for about a year and it was great. Then, Callcentric
was the subject of a DDOS attack. Shortly thereafter, Callcentric was
affected by flooding in New York City. I bailed.
I have voip.ms now. It is pretty good. It uses multiple servers,
distributed around the world. You can switch servers at any time. The
flooding business in NYC made this an attractive feature, for me.
Both of these services will work with your Obihai ATA. They both have
e911 service. They both charge by the minute. Monthly fees are not as
good as Ring.To, apparently. Both of these services provide a good call
filtering feature. This is important. I get a lot of unwanted calls. I
don't know if this is because I use VOIP service. Both of these services
require a bit of computer knowhow to use. That should not be an issue
for you.
BTW, Google Voice is now enabled again on the Obihai ATA. So that's a
Ring.To alternative as well, and they don't require E911 service though
I would get it for $1 per month anyway.
Jeff Liebermann
2015-04-12 15:54:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
BTW, Google Voice is now enabled again on the Obihai ATA. So that's a
Ring.To alternative as well, and they don't require E911 service though
I would get it for $1 per month anyway.
I use the same phone number at 3 different locations using SIP phones.
If I subscribe to 911, I have to specify an address. Which one I
select is a problem because the 911 database is attached to a phone
number, not a phone device ID. There's technology available to
transmit the LAT-LONG location (and a bunch of other stuff) along with
a 911 call,
<https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6442>
<https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5222>
but the local PSAP doesn't have anything to deal with it. I think (not
sure) this might be specified in the Phase II E-911 specs. So, I have
a list of direct emergency numbers that hopefully will work in an
emergency. The one time I tried to use one, I suspect that calling on
my cell phone, getting the CHP in Sacramento, and getting transferred
back to the local PSAP, would have been quicker.

Internet Protocol-based Emergency Services
<https://books.google.com/books?id=znlUGTW_X4MC&printsec=frontcover>
--
Jeff Liebermann ***@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
Jeff Liebermann
2015-04-12 15:33:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Has anyone else here done do-it-yourself VOIP rather than using Ooma,
Magicjack, etc.?
Yep. My guess is about 8 home users with variable results. Most
common complaints revolve around administering the account online,
configuring phones, problems with fax machines, and general difficulty
understanding the technology.

For Comcast (and others), you will need to enable and configure QoS:
<http://webadmin.comcast.net/xb3/USGUSERADMIN/qos1.php>
in order to prevent the phone call from being mangled by other traffic
on the router. Comcast firmware does not offer QoS by service, such
as SIP, so could have problem. I avoid the issue by using a separate
cable modem, followed by a real router.

For home users, I like Future-Nine:
<http://www.future-nine.com/plans.html>
Three big advantages. Cheap, cheap, and cheap. I use the "Bare
Essentials" plan at $75/year. I don't have 911 service because I have
three SIP phones on the same phone number. Essentially, they're
treated as "extensions" and all ring at the same time for incoming
calls. I have one in my office, my home, and a softphone on my
various devices. If you're going to do this, make sure your VoIP
provider supports "extensions" in this manner and hopefully doesn't
charge extra.

You'll find some vendors, such as Callcentric:
<http://www.callcentric.com/products/>
that charge separately for incoming and outgoing service. This gives
some flexibility in billing, but also creates some confusion. For
example, I have a client with one incoming line, which has a proper
DID phone number assigned, but 3 additional lines that are outgoing
only with no phone numbers, which saves quite a bit of money.

Note that calls between SIP phones are free. I setup a pair of SIP
phones for a customer that has several people working at home. They
could have uses Skype, Netmeeting, or other conference calling
software, but wanted something that require a 24x7 computer, and that
would work through the company SIP phone system. When calls can last
all day, the free direct SIP to SIP feature is nice.

One problem that drives me nuts are attacks from the internet to ports
5060-5064 on my SIP phones. I guess they're looking for Asterisk
switches or misconfigured phones. The result is my phones are
sometimes hung or confused.

Before you take the plunge, methinks it's a good idea to test your
Comcast connection for jitter and packet loss. I've seen some Comcast
lines that can download at 16 Mbits/sec, but are terrible for jitter.
Try several of these online VoIP test sites:
<https://www.google.com/search?q=voip+test>
Here's the report for my 1.5Mbit/sec DSL line using G.711(64Kbits/sec)
which shows that my line is marginal.
<http://mcs.rubiconn.com/myspeed/db/report?id=408703>

Good luck.
--
Jeff Liebermann ***@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
d***@02.usenet.us.com
2015-04-12 17:10:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Liebermann
on the router. Comcast firmware does not offer QoS by service, such
as SIP, so could have problem. I avoid the issue by using a separate
cable modem, followed by a real router.
The current default Comcast router/modem is so bad, VoIP isn't the only
reason to dump it.
Post by Jeff Liebermann
Comcast connection for jitter and packet loss. I've seen some Comcast
My Comcast tests at 60/6+ MBpS, but seems to have some trouble that I haven't
quite nailed down, maybe making a new connection.
The VoIP tests are happy.

I use a headset for most calls, so the actual phone device doesn't matter.


There haven't been any AT&T wires in my house in years.
AT&T was outside in a sidewalk vault yesterday, which was the first time I
had even thought about them in a long time.
--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65
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